Category Archive:苏州美甲学校

Keith William Green granted bail over Maryville peeping tom allegations ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Man arrested wearing bra BAIL: Keith William Green is mobbed my the media after being released from the Newcastle courthouse cells on Wednesday afternoon.

苏州美甲学校

FREE: Keith William Green is mobbed my the media after being released from the Newcastle courthouse cells on Wednesday afternoon.

TweetFacebook BAIL: Keith William Green is mobbed my the media after being released from the Newcastle courthouse cells on Wednesday afternoon. +2MORE GALLERIES

facebookSHAREtwitterTWEETemailwhatsappAN accused Peeping Tom allegedly found inside a woman’s home at Maryville on Tuesday night was wearing blue women’s underpants and a bra and was carrying a pile of women’s clothes and a black wig when he was arrested, court documents state.

Police allege he had “ratchet tie-down straps” secured around his neck with cable ties. The straps were secured down his back and inside his underpants with more cable ties, police said.

Accused Maryville peeping tom Keith William Green is released from custody. Story to come. @newcastleheraldpic.twitter苏州美甲学校/ySqCDoMsvk

— Sam Rigney (@SamRigney) May 10, 2017

Keith William Green, 55, of Raymond Terrace, appeared in Newcastle Local Court in handcuffs, a pair of green prison-issue shorts and a jumper on Wednesday charged with enter dwelling with intent and peep or pry.

His solicitor, Kristy Wade, pleaded not guilty to both charges and applied for bail on Mr Green’s behalf.

According to a statement of police facts, the alleged victim was at home on Sunday night when she saw a man standing in her backyard.

She grabbed a torch and the man, who was was wearing only a pair of white underpants, fled.

Then on Tuesday night about 11.25pm, the woman was asleep in her unit when she heard someone come in.

She walked into the lounge room and saw a man –wearing nothing but a pair of dark-coloured underpants – standing behind the lounge room door, court documents state.

“The alleged victim noticed that the accused had something protruding from the rear of his head but was unable to describe this object any further,” police facts state.The woman told police she recognised the man from a few nights earlier and told him to leave.The man ran out the front door and the alleged victim called police.

Police patrolled the area and allegedly found Mr Green running along Lewis Street at 11.36pm, court documents state.

At this stage, police allegehe was wearing underpants and a dark jumper and was carrying a bundle of ladies clothes and a black wig.

When police asked about the clothes, Mr Green allegedly said they were his.When asked about the cable ties and ratchet straps, the accused replied: “I don’t know”, court documents state.

Magistrate Robert Stone granted Mr Green bail on the condition he live at Raymond Terrace, report to police, adhere to a curfew, not enter the suburb of Maryville and provide a $1000 surety.

The matter was adjourned until June 22.

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Economics shoots … and scores! ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Imagine Steve Jobs saying the iPhone is useless or Bill Gates recommending that Microsoft Office be thrown out the window.

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Such a bizarre situation exists in the world’s most popular sport, association football (or soccer). And those who saw the nerve-wrecking A-League grand final clash between Sydney FC and Melbourne Victory on Sunday probably sensed that the problem at hand is the penalty shoot-out.

The parallels between the economy and sport are stronger than they seem, and economic research can be useful in both arenas by identifying “welfare-improving” rules and policies.

In 2006, FIFA’s then president, Sepp Blatter, said: “Football World Cup, it is a passion, and when the match goes into extra time, it’s a drama. But when it comes to penalty kicks, it’s a tragedy.”

Blatter’s statement followed the 2006 World Cup final, which featured arch-rivals Italy and France and was decided by a penalty shoot-out. His statement was motivated by the large number of important matches decided in this cruel lottery.

What’s the problem? Blatter’s primary issue was not just the randomness of the shoot-out but that it doesn’t provide a team contest. It also puts extreme pressure on individual penalty takers, who may suffer major psychological trauma if they miss. One may recall the agony and tears of players such as England’s David Beckham, France’s David Trezeguet, Chelsea’s John Terry and, most recently, Melbourne Victory’s Carl Valeri and Marco Rojas, who missed the penalty kicks in Sunday’s grand final.

FIFA’s efforts to reduce the reliance on penalty shoot-outs resulted in adopting the so-called “golden goal” between 1993 and 2002, which meant “sudden death” for the team that first conceded a goal in extra time. The rule tried to ensure that there was more attacking play and thus fewer matches decided in a shoot-out.

The fiasco of this rule did not surprise economists, because they pay attention to the effects of various policies on incentives of economic subjects. It was clear to them that the golden goal not only increased the “reward” for scoring a goal – and therefore incentives for players to attack in extra time – but it also increased the “punishment” for conceding a goal – and therefore incentives to defend. As it turned out, the latter effect was stronger due to a phenomenon known as “loss aversion”, a theory for which Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky received the Nobel prize in economics in 2002. When it became apparent that the golden goal was counterproductive and led to fewer goals in extra time, FIFA abandoned it. How can economics help?

Are there alternatives to the penalty shoot-out that would eliminate the above shortcomings and alleviate the football tragedy? This is where economic research can help, by answering the following question: what would happen if we swapped the extra time and penalty shoot-out around? If, after a tie in regulation time (90 minutes), the shoot-out first took place, and only then did the 30-minute extra time follow? Under this new sequencing the team that scored the most goals in extra time would win – regardless of the outcome of the preceding shoot-out. Only in the event that the extra time ended in a draw would the shoot-out result become relevant and determine the winner of the game.

The positive psychological effects of this change are obvious. The team losing the shoot-out would have an opportunity to sway the match in its favour in the subsequent extra time. If it failed, it would be perceived as a failure of the team, not the individual who missed the 12-yard kick. This would naturally reduce their stress and stigmatisation.

Other effects of the proposed rule change are quantified in my study (with colleagues Liam Lenten from La Trobe University and Petr Stehl??k from University of West Bohemia) published in the Journal of Sports Economics. Our econometric analysis of a large number of football matches shows the proposed move of penalties before extra time would strongly encourage attacking play and increase scoring in extra time. According to our estimates, in competitions such as the World Cup or the European Champions League final, the rule would increase the likelihood of a goal in extra time by 45 to 60 per cent. It would therefore reduce the proportion of tedious games with scoreless extra time by half, from 50 to 25 per cent. It’s because one team would always have an incentive to attack – unlike under the status quo, whereby both teams often defend and wait for the shoot-out.

Our study shows the exact boost in extra-time scoring would depend on many factors, such as the number of goals in regulation time, tournament round, home-ground advantage and relative strength of the teams (which we measure by bookmakers’ odds). Our regression models suggest, for example, that the probability of a goal being scored in extra-time of a World Cup quarterfinal, between two equally favoured opponents tied nil all after regulation time, would increase from the current 35.2 to 61.9 per cent. If this same type of match finished one all after the regulation 90 minutes, the scoring probability would increase from 46 to 72 per cent under the new rule.

Therefore, we hope that, after the successful launch of the goal-line technology and promising trials of video-refereeing, FIFA officials decide to test other football innovations, including the proposed swap of extra time and penalties. It would allow economic research to prevent many future soccer and personal tragedies.

Dr Jan Libich is a senior lecturer in macroeconomics at La Trobe University.

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Kasiano could be squeezed out as Bulldogs overhaul roster ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Sam Kasiano could be the first contracted Bulldog to leave Belmore as part of the club’s roster overhaul after Melbourne made a play for the hulking prop.

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The Storm is desperate to bolster its forward pack and have identified Kasiano as the man to help fill the void. The ladder leaders rarely attempt to recruit an established star but are making an exception as they brace for the departure of Blues hopeful Jordan McLean (Cowboys) and Kiwi international Tohu Harris (Warriors) just a year after losing Kevin Proctor to the Gold Coast.

Cooper Cronk’s decision to shift to Sydney also frees up salary cap space for the club to make a play for a big-name forward for the first time since luring Michael Crocker from the Roosters in 2006.

Kasiano is contracted to Canterbury until the end of 2018, but the club will need to shed stars, contracted or otherwise, to refresh its playing list. Coach Des Hasler is keen to retain the New Zealand and Samoan international but something has to give after the club confirmed the signing of Kieran Foran on Wednesday. Kasiano is one of several players on a back-ended deal, meaning his departure could be a win for the Bulldogs and the Storm.

A move south will also give Kasiano the opportunity to start games, a scenario which is no chance of happening when Woods arrives at the “family club” next year. The Bulldogs are unlikely to stand in Kasiano’s way if he is able to secure himself a long-term deal that sets up his future.

Josh Reynolds’ shift to Wests Tigers in 2018 will free up some salary cap space, while Will Hopoate and Michael Lichaa are yet to secure a home for next season. However, Canterbury is facing the prospect of bidding farewell to more players if the NRL doesn’t budge on its initial salary cap proposal to the Rugby League Players’ Association as part of the collective bargaining agreement negotiations.

Skipper James Graham, on a deal worth the best part of $1 million for 2018, has been identified as another player that could be squeezed out. Cashed-up Newcastle is watching the situation with interest after missing out on a number of potential recruits including Matt Scott, Dale Finucane, Matt Prior and Jack Bird. Halfback Moses Mbye has been shopped to rivals, while there has also been conjecture over the future of the Morris twins, Brett and Josh.

The Storm were one of Foran’s suitors, but the New Zealand international chose Canterbury to be closer to his two young children. The Storm have also missed out on Anthony Milford, who has recommitted to the Broncos.

Foran has a strong relationship with Hasler from their time together at Manly and came agonisingly close to rejoining his former mentor the last two times he was off contract.

“I know that family was a determining priority in Kieran’s decision,” Hasler said.

“He could have chosen to go to a handful of Sydney clubs, so we are pleased that he has chosen to continue his career at the Bulldogs.”

The Tigers and Cowboys are both keen on adding Tuimoala Lolohea to their roster immediately and are hopeful the Warriors will grant him an immediate release. The out-of-favour playmaker would slot in for the injured Johnathan Thurston if he shifts to Townsville, while a transfer to the Tigers would allow Mitchell Moses an early move to Parramatta.

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Categories: 苏州美甲学校

Open for inspection ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Aberglasslyn9.45am – 10.15am | 18 Lapwing Street | $370,000-$400,000 | 0478 824 290

苏州美甲学校

10.30am – 11.00am | 21 Hibiscus Crescent | $400,000-$430,000 | 0478 824 290

Adamstown11.00am – 11.45am | 20 Olney Road | $585,000 – $615,000 | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 2/3 Fourth Street | $690,000-$740,000 | 0411 843 051

Adamstown Heights10.00am – 10.30am | 14 Randall Parade | Auction | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 22 Montrose Avenue | Auction 20/5/17 | 0410 468 968

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 160 Princeton Avenue | $1,250,000 – $1,375, | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 408, Brunker Road | Auction | 4908 5900

Arcadia Vale11.30am – 12.00pm | 19 Brooks Street | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4959 1466

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 35 Arcadia Street | $460,000 – $490,000 | 4975 1644

Awaba1.00pm – 1.30pm | 24 Wyong Street | AUCTION 27.05.17 | 4959 1466

Barnsley10.00am – 10.30am | 17 Codrington Street | $340,000-$370,000 | 0412 290 452

Belmont9.30am – 10.00am | E201 11 Ernest Street | By Neg $430,000 – $4 | 4945 8600

10.00am – 10.30am | E109 11 Ernest Street | By Neg $415,000 – $4 | 4945 8600

10.00am – 10.30am | 43 Livingstone Street | By Neg $400,000 – $4 | 4945 8600

11.00am – 11.30am | 12 Aylward Street | Auction | 4945 8600

11.00am – 11.30am | 24 Bellevue Road | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

11.00am – 11.30am | 24 George Street | Preview | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.30pm | 88 Ross Street | Auction | 4915 7888

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 19 Deane Street | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 49 Evans Street | $515,000-$540,000 | 0412 290 452

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 403/58 Brooks Parade | $1,100,000 | 4945 8600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 17A Aylward Street | $775,000 – $850,000 | 4903 8228

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 5 Lee Ann Crescent | $795,000 | 4915 7888

3.00pm – 3.30pm | 3 Lewers Street | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

Belmont North10.30am – 11.00am | 5 Kananook Cresent | $599,950 | 4943 6333

11.00am – 11.30am | 28 Leicester Avenue | $515,000 – $535,000 | 4908 5900

11.15am – 11.45am | 41 Camberwarra Drive | $780,000 | 4928 7400

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 69a John Street | $775,000 – $850,000 | 4904 8400

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 2/51 Mirambeena Street | Auction | 4945 8600

Belmont South1.00pm – 1.30pm | 4 McEwan Street | Preview | 4915 7888

Blackalls Park11.00am – 11.30am | 1 Adam Street | $565,000 – $615,000 | 4903 8228

Bolton Point10.00am – 10.30am | 16 Bolton Close | $480,000 – $520,000 | 0249 260 600

Bonnells Bay10.30am – 11.30am | 1b Amos Street | $475k to $520K | 4944 5600

Boolaroo9.00am – 10.00am | 42 Main Road | $449,000 – $465,000 | 4943 6333

9.00am – 10.00am | 42 Main Road | $349,000 – $355,000 | 4943 6333

9.00am – 10.00am | 42 Main Road | $420,000 – $435,000 | 4943 6333

10.00am – 10.30am | 2 Fourth Street | Guide $540,000 | 4944 5600

11.30am – 12.00pm | 24 Fifth Street | $370,000 to $410,000 | 4950 6111

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 42 Main Road | $449,000 – $465,000 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 42 Main Road | $420,000 – $435,000 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 42 Main Road | $349,000 – $355,000 | 4943 6333

Booragul10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Rens Street | Auction | 4959 1677

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 5 Rens Street | Auction | 4959 1677

Broadmeadow11.00am – 1.00pm | Display 128 Beaumont St | Contact Agent | 0417 030 301

Buttaba11.00am – 11.30am | 2 Newark Street | $559,000 | 4975 4800

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 15 Fred Avery Drive | $795,000 | 4959 1677

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 25 Haslemere Crescent | $579,000 | 4975 1644

Cameron Park10.00am – 10.30am | 27 Floresta Crescent | $495,000 – $530,000 | 4989 4008

10.00am – 10.30am | 1 Lucia Crescent | $490,000 – $525,000 | 4989 4008

10.00am – 10.30am | 2/51 Flamingo Drive | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

11.30am – 12.00pm | 172 Northlakes Drive | $610,000 to $660,000 | 4950 6111

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 6 Graysynd Circuit | $550,000 – $600,000 | 4950 8555

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 27 Craighill Crescent | $500,000 – $550,000 | 4950 8555

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 8 Hoya Close | $510,000 – $550,000 | 0410 447 054

Cardiff10.00am – 10.30am | 28 Illawarra Avenue | $540,000 – $570,000 | 4908 5900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 2/5 Blaxland Road | $549,000-$599,000 | 4960 0499

Cardiff Heights10.00am – 10.30am | 19 Rowes Lane | $650,000 – $680,000 | 4952 6500

Carrington11.00am – 11.30am | 133 Hill Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 89 Doran Street | Auction 13/5 12:45pm | 0402 411 317

Charlestown10.00am – 10.30am | 4/24 Madeleine Avenue | $440,000 – $460,000 | 4904 8400

10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Chester Close | $795,000 – $870,000 | 0413 437654

10.00am – 10.30am | 6/21 Edward Street | Guide $450,000 – $46 | 4908 5900

10.15am – 10.45am | 16 Algona Road | Guide: $640,000 | 4904 8400

11.00am – 11.30am | 7 Hallam Street | Guide: $640,000 | 4904 8400

11.45am – 12.15pm | 150 Tirriki Street | Auction | 4904 8400

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 69 James Street | $600,000 – $650,000 | 4904 8400

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 16 Bradman Close | $635,000 | 4943 6333

Coal Point10.00am – 10.30am | 110 Coal Point Road | $590,000 | 4959 1677

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 267A Coal Point Rd | $1850000 – $1950000 | 4959 8667

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 8 Rofe Street | AUCTION 20.05.17 | 4975 1644

12.45pm – 1.15pm | 19 Rofe Street | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4959 1466

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 27 Whitelocke Street | $650,000 | 4959 1677

3.00pm – 3.45pm | 355 Coal Point Road | $975,000 | 4959 1677

Cooks Hill10.00am – 10.30am | 86 Bull Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.30am – 11.00am | 74 Bull Street | Guide $825,000 | 0418 682 377

10.30am – 11.00am | 15 Young Street | Auction 27/5 10:30am | 0402 411 317

10.30am – 11.00am | 110 Bull Street | Auction Sat 13th May | 4902 7222

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 72 Bruce Street | Auction | 4915 3000

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 10/75 Union Street | $450,000 – $475,000 | 0417 030 301

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 50 Parkway Avenue | Auction | 4959 1677

Croudace Bay2.00pm – 2.30pm | 31 Corymbia Street | $695,000 | 4908 5900

Dora Creek10.00am – 10.30am | 32 Dora Street | $579,000 – $629,000 | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 76 Kalang Rd | AUCTION | 4959 8667

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 270A Dora Street | AUCTION | 0410 545 947

Dudley11.00am – 11.30am | 10 Frederick Street | Auction 27/5/17 | 0419 605801

Edgeworth1.00pm – 1.30pm | 3 Kinross Avenue | $450,000 – $495,000 | 4950 8555

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 13 Carinda Avenue | $500,000 – $550,000 | 4950 8555

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 17 Oakville Road | $395,000 – $430,000 | 4950 8555

Eleebana9.00am – 9.30am | 1 Rothbury Street | $779,500 | 4943 6333

11.00am – 11.30am | 22 Haynes Avenue | Guide $600,000 | 4944 5600

11.00am – 11.30am | 47 Jonathon Street | Price On Request | 4944 5600

11.30am – 12.00pm | 7 Moani Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 16 Dalwood Close | Guide $1.05M to $1.1 | 4944 5600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 100 Glad Gunson Drive | $690,000 – $740,000 | 4903 8228

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 8 Wyndham Way | Guide $825,000 | 4944 5600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 3 Boatmans Row | $1,185,000 – $1,300, | 4902 7222

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 63 Croft Road | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4915 3800

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 1 Rothbury Street | $779,500 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 41 Ian Street | Guide $780K to $85K | 4944 5600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 4 Clare Close | $840,000-$870,000 | 4915 7888

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 16, Charlton Street | $1,750,000 | 4908 5900

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 10 Ian Street | $599,000 | 4915 3800

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 42 Haynes Avenue | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4915 3800

Elermore Vale11.00am – 11.30am | 41 Virgo Street | $430,000 – $470,000 | 4957 6166

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 28 Pisces Avenue | $720,000-$780,000 | 0414 253 545

Fennell Bay10.00am – 10.30am | 31/305 Main Road | $345,000 | 4975 4800

Fern Bay11.30am – 12.00pm | 21 Diuris Street | $650,000 – $715,000 | 4989 4018

Fishing Point11.00am – 11.30am | 134 Fishing Point Road | $750,000 – $795,000 | 4959 8667

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 75 Sealand Road | $595,000 | 4959 1677

2.15pm – 2.45pm | 132a Fishing Point Road | $749,000 | 4959 1466

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 6 Balmoral Place | $695,000 – $725,000 | 4959 1466

Fletcher11.00am – 11.30am | 4 Oak Close | $635,000 | 0418447856

11.00am – 11.30am | 17 Ebony Close | $620,000-$660,000 | 0412 290 452

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 9 Brookfield Avenue | $580,000-$600,000 | 0409 099 991

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 1/33 Churnwood Drive | $495,000 – $530,000 | 4989 4021

Floraville11.15am – 11.45am | 66 Marlin Avenue | Auction | 4904 8400

11.45am – 12.15pm | 1 Regency Place | $699,000-$730,000 | 0410 312 281

Fullerton Cove11.00am – 4.00pm | The Cove Village | Contact Agent | 4908 5900

Garden Suburb10.15am – 11.00am | 34 Rose Close | $485,000 – $525,000 | 4957 6166

11.30am – 12.00pm | 58 Robinia Grove | $775,000 | 0418 684 866

12.00pm – 12.45pm | 18 Irvine Street | $800,000 – $825,000 | 4952 6500

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 122 Prospect Road | Auction 27/05/17 | 4961 5181

Georgetown11.00am – 11.30am | 50 Chatham Road | Auction | 4908 5900

Hamilton10.00am – 10.30am | 35 Cameron Street | Auction | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 7/113 Cleary Street | $795,000 | 0423 375 591

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 43 Everton Street | Auction | 4943 6333

12.10pm – 12.40pm | 21 Cleary Street | $650,000 – $700,000 | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 2.00pm | 22 Cleary Street | $1.05M-$1.1M | 0409 562 633

Hamilton North10.00am – 10.45am | 44 Boreas Road | AUCTION | 0412 496 610

2.15pm – 2.45pm | 12 Phillips Street | Auction | 4904 8400

Hamilton South1.00pm – 1.30pm | 94A Kemp Street | $1,080,000 – $1,120, | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 94 Kemp Street | $1,150,000 – $1,220, | 4902 7222

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 2/20 Churchill Circuit | Preview | 4915 7888

Heddon Greta4.00pm – 4.30pm | 6 Errol Close | $420,000-$460,000 | 4915 7888

Hillsborough10.00am – 10.30am | 105 Hillsborough Road | Auction | 4950 8555

Islington10.30am – 11.00am | 4 Hubbard Street | Auction 27/05/17 | 4961 5181

11.00am – 11.45am | 6 Redman Street | $500,000-$550,000 | 4960 0499

Jesmond10.30am – 11.00am | 17 Heaton Street | $429,000 | 0411 843 051

10.30am – 11.00am | 7/50 Robert Street | $325,000 | 4950 2025

11.15am – 11.45am | 10/6-8 Goodwin Street | $382,000 | 4950 2025

11.30am – 12.00pm | 28 Steel Street | $565,000 | 0413 209 505

Jewells10.00am – 10.30am | 22 Ntaba Road | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

Kahibah9.30am – 10.00am | 73 Burwood Street | Contact Agent | 4904 8400

10.45am – 11.15am | 61 Burwood Street | $645,000 | 4943 6333

Kilaben Bay10.30am – 11.00am | 27 Barina Avenue | $750,000 | 4959 1677

11.00am – 11.30am | 15 Lakeview Road | $695,000 | 4959 1677

Kotara11.00am – 11.30am | 9 Lynette Place | Price on Request | 4902 7222

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 13 Moruya Parade | $550,000 – $590,000 | 0249 260 600

Kotara South10.00am – 10.30am | 30 Elvidge Crescent | $599,950 | 4943 6333

Lambton10.00am – 10.30am | 8 Croudace Street | $465,000 – $510,000 | 0410 468 968

11.00am – 11.30am | 96 Howe Street | AUCTION | 0407 826 391

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 11, Jerrawa Close | $730,000 – $770,000 | 4908 5900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 12 Kerrai Close | Guide $700,000 | 0249 260 600

Macquarie Hills10.00am – 10.30am | 1/5 Blaxland Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.30am – 11.00am | 4 Ripon Way | Preview | 0410 312 281

11.15am – 11.45am | 56 Delaware Drive | $670,000 to $695,000 | 4928 7400

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 50 Delaware Drive | $730,000-$790,000 | 4954 7447

Marks Point11.00am – 11.30am | 153 Marks Point Road | $995K to $1.055M | 4944 5600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 7 Village Bay Close | $965K to $995K | 4944 5600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 44 Emily Street | $500,000 – $550,000 | 4908 5900

Maryland11.00am – 11.30am | 36 Seaton Street | $495,000-$535,000 | 0427 491 273

11.15am – 11.45am | 62 Alkoo Crescent | $500,000 to $540,000 | 4955 6900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 18 Karneen Avenue | $650,000 – $700,000 | 4904 8400

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 15 Seaton Street | $510,000 – $560,000 | 0249 260 600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 43 Berrico Avenue | $520,000 – $555,000 | 4989 4021

Maryville12.00pm – 12.30pm | 47 Lewis Street | Auction | 0408 525 362

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 75 Northumberland Street | Price on Request | 4989 4013

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 25 McMichael Street | Auction 3/6/17 | 0410 468 968

Mayfield10.00am – 10.30am | 92 Kerr Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

11.00am – 11.30am | 35 Kerr Street | Auction | 4950 8555

11.15am – 12.00pm | 4 Texas Street | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

11.30am – 12.00pm | 10 Cadell Avenue | $490,000-$530,000 | 0425 278 850

12.00pm – 12.45pm | 32 Upfold Street | $500,000-$550,000 | 4960 0499

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 5/16 Myola Street | $395,000 – $415,000 | 0407 826 391

1.00pm – 1.45pm | 44 Ingall Street | AUCTION | 4960 0499

Mayfield East12.00pm – 12.30pm | 4 Crebert Street | $650,000 | 4908 5900

Merewether10.00am – 10.30am | 4/52 Wilton Street | Guide $470,000 | 0411 573 538

10.30am – 11.30am | 56 Frederick Street | $1.78m – $1.9m | 0411745788

11.00am – 11.30am | 160 Glebe Road | Auction | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 200 Scenic Drive | Price on Request | 4989 4003

11.50am – 12.20pm | 40a Rowan Crescent | Auction | 4902 7222

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 67 Wilton Street | Auction | 4902 7222

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 13 Macquarie Street | Auction 3/6 10.30am | 0418 682 377

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 11 Janet Street | Price on Request | 4989 4003

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 21 Curry Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 3/20 Winsor Street | $750,000 | 4989 4003

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 2/36 John Parade | $490,000 | 4989 4013

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 52 Myamblah Crescent | $890,000 | 4989 4003

Mirrabooka12.00pm – 1.00pm | 67 Hillcrest Road | $735,000 | 4944 5600

Mount Hutton1.00pm – 1.30pm | 51 Auklet Road | $229,950 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 189 Old Warners Bay Road | $1.775M to $1.9M | 4944 5600

Murrays Beach2.30pm – 3.00pm | 27 Lake Forest Drive | By Neg $725,000 $765 | 4945 8600

Nelson Bay10.00am – 10.30am | 3/15 Victoria Parade | Guide $475,000 | 4944 5600

Newcastle9.30am – 10.00am | 4/22 Brown Street | $399,000 | 0402 009 532

10.00am – 10.30am | 506/335 Wharf Road | $620,000 – $670,000 | 0417 030 301

10.00am – 10.30am | 609/12 Bellevue Street | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

10.00am – 10.30am | 9/522 Hunter Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.30am – 11.00am | 33/304 Wharf Road | $1,800,000- $1,900,0 | 4902 7222

10.30am – 11.00am | 1/5 Tudor Street | $440,000 – $480,000 | 4989 4013

11.15am – 11.45am | Lvl 6, 6/610 Worth Place | $730,000 | 4902 7222

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 901/6 Watt Street | Auction 27/5/17 | 0410 468 968

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 505/2 Honeysuckle Drive | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 401/5 Honeysuckle Drive | Auction | 4904 8400

2.15pm – 2.45pm | 1/570 Hunter Street | $380,000 – $410,000 | 0417 030 301

3.15pm – 3.45pm | 305/111 Scott Street | $420,000 – $450,000 | 0417 030 301

Newcastle East10.00am – 10.30am | 308/26 Pacific Street | $475,000 – $485,000 | 0407 826 391

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 9 Beach Street | $1.29m-$1.35m | 0412 680 584

Newcastle West10.15am – 10.45am | 401/12 Bellevue Street | $640,000 – $680,000 | 4957 6166

New Lambton9.00am – 9.30am | 1-5/9 Regent Street | $789,000 – $798,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 8 Mahogany Drive | Price On Request | 4902 7222

11.30am – 12.00pm | 3 Hitchcock Avenue | $680,000 | 4989 4013

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 178 Bridges Road | $499,000 | 0411 843 051

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 31 Jellicoe Parade | $690,000 – $759,000 | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 25 Errington Avenue | $700,000 – $750,000 | 4957 6166

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 49 Carrington Parade | Contact Agent | 0412 680 584

New Lambton Heights11.00am – 11.30am | 56 Holly Circuit | $550,000 – $570,000 | 4952 6500

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 7 Grandview Road | $580,000-$630,000 | 4954 7447

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 8 Ridegway Road | $1,325,000 – $1,400, | 4957 6166

North Lambton12.00pm – 12.30pm | 11 Kindra Place | $470,000 | 0418447856

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 13 Notley Street | $449,950 | 4908 5900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 14 Third Avenue | $730,000 – $780,000 | 0413 209 505

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 308 Newcastle Road | $380,000-$410,000 | 4960 0499

Pelican12.00pm – 12.30pm | 30 Karog Street | $645,000-$695,000 | 4915 7888

Rankin Park1.00pm – 1.30pm | 288 Grandview Road | Preview | 4908 5900

Rathmines11.00am – 11.45am | 12 The Circlet | Auction Today | 4959 1677

Raymond Terrace10.00am – 10.30am | 110 Dalyell Way | 489000 | 4928 4000

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 20 Anne Street | $269,000 – $295,000 | 4903 8228

Redhead10.00am – 10.30am | 85 Cowlishaw Street | Guide: $840,000 | 4904 8400

Rutherford10.30am – 11.00am | 17 Grand Parade | $490,000 – $530,000 | 4915 3800

Shortland9.30am – 10.30am | 22 Akuna Avenue | $430,000 – $470,000 | 4989 4013

10.00am – 10.30am | 190 Marsden Street | $550,000-$590,000 | 0412 290 452

11.00am – 11.30am | 25 Mawson Street | $455,000-$495,000 | 4954 7447

Speers Point12.30pm – 1.00pm | 60 Lakeview Street | $660,000 – $710,000 | 4908 5900

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 32 Hibiscus Close | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

3.00pm – 3.45pm | 17A Berkeley Street | Auction | 0418447856

Stockton10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Monmouth Street | Auction | 4955 6900

11.00am – 11.30am | 276 Fullerton Street | Preview | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 154 Douglas Street | Auction | 4955 6900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 221 Mitchell Street | 1.7m | 4928 7400

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 31 Newcastle Street | Auction | 4955 6900

Tanilba Bay3.00pm – 3.30pm | 48 Caswell Crescent | $700,000 to $770,000 | 4955 6900

The Hill10.00am – 10.30am | 3 Barker Street | $1,500,000 | 4989 4018

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 96 Wolfe Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 4/36 Kitchener Parade | Guide: $375,000 | 4904 8400

The Junction10.30am – 11.00am | 5/17 Kemp Street | $480,000 – $520,000 | 0249 260 600

Thornton12.30pm – 1.00pm | 20 Welwin Close | $465,000 to $500,000 | 4955 6900

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 17 Ridgemont Street | $580,000 – $630,000 | 0408 525 362

Tighes Hill10.00am – 10.30am | 40 Mitchell Street | $700,000 to $750,000 | 4928 7400

10.50am – 11.20am | 60 Elizabeth Street | Auction | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 14 Union Street | Guide on Request | 4929 5999

Tingira Heights1.30pm – 2.00pm | 33 Walumbi Avenue | Price guide $490,000 | 4908 5900

Toronto10.30am – 11.00am | 2&4 Warhurst Avenue | $440,000 – $460,000 | 4959 1466

11.00am – 11.30am | 6 Jarrett Street | AUCTION 01.06.17 | 4975 1644

11.30am – 12.00pm | 1 Cockatiel Street | $495,000 – $539,000 | 4959 1466

Valentine10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Japonica Place | Price on Request | 4989 4003

10.00am – 10.30am | 19 Mountbatten Place | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4942 8377

10.45am – 11.15am | 5/58 Allambee Place | $390,000 – $420,000 | 4915 3800

11.00am – 11.30am | 56 Berringar Road | $760,000 – $790,000 | 4942 8377

11.00am – 11.30am | 94 Dilkera Avenue | Preview | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 6/25-27 Lurnea Crescent | $459,000 | 4915 3800

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 49 Dilkera Avenue | By Neg $2,350,000 – | 4945 8600

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 1/3 Ruston Avenue | $480K to $520K | 4944 5600

Wallsend10.00am – 10.30am | 7 Dorrigo Street | Guide: $470,000 | 4904 8400

10.00am – 10.00am | 15 Moresby Street | $599,000 – $629,000 | 0400 911 802

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 12 Invermore Close | $549,950 | 4961 5181

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 24 Cressington Way | $575,000 | 4950 2025

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 3 Bean Street | $620,000 to $680,000 | 4955 6900

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 79 Macquarie Street | $400,000 to $500,000 | 4928 7400

Wangi Wangi12.00pm – 12.30pm | 41 Dobell Drive | $1250000 – $1295000 | 4959 8667

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 320 Dobell Drive | $949,000 – $995,000 | 4975 4800

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 4 Crescent Road | $749,000 | 4975 1644

Warabrook1.30pm – 2.00pm | 14 Eurabbie Avenue | $750,000 | 4950 2025

Waratah10.00am – 10.30am | 25 Platt Street | Auction 13/05/17 | 4961 5181

11.30am – 12.15pm | 1, 2, 3/6 High Street | $550,000 – $600,000 | 4989 4011

12.30pm – 1.30pm | 51 Station Street Waratah | Auction 27/05/17 | 0425 290 322

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 10 Myall Road | Guide- $750,000 | 0249 260 600

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 6/50 Waroonga Road | $270,000-$285,000 | 4915 7888

Warners Bay10.00am – 1.00pm | 215/6 King Street | $699,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 4/74 Albert Street | $460,000 – $490,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 99 Myles Ave | – | 4929 5999

10.00am – 10.30am | 6/68 Albert Street | $479,000 | 4915 3800

10.00am – 10.30am | 2/4 Yortson Street | $395,000 – $429,000 | 4902 7222

10.00am – 1.00pm | 221/6 Kings Street | $379,000 | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 95 Bayview Street | $529,000 – $569,000 | 4908 5900

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 6 Peachwood Close | $625,000 – $685,000 | 4903 8228

12.45pm – 1.15pm | 22 Rayford Street | $795,000 – $850,000 | 4903 8228

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 56 Mills Street | Auction | 0418447856

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 2/68 Queen Street | Guide: $390,000 | 4904 8400

West Wallsend3.30pm – 4.00pm | 7 Hyndes Street | $385,000 – $420,000 | 4950 8555

Whitebridge11.00am – 11.30am | 5 Kopa Street | Auction 20/5/17 | 0413 437654

11.00am – 11.30am | 6 Bulls Garden Road | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

11.00am – 11.30am | 142-146 Dudley Road | From $400,000 | 4904 8400

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 44 Justine Avenue | $645,000 – $675,000 | 4943 6333

Wickham10.45am – 11.15am | 106a The Lane | Auction 13/5 11:15am | 0412 680 584

Windale3.30pm – 4.00pm | 12 Wakool Street | $345,000 – $375,000 | 4950 8555

Woodrising1.30pm – 2.00pm | 4 Azzura Close | $455,000 – $485,000 | 4959 8667

Yarrawonga Park11.30am – 12.00pm | 23, Yoorala Road | Preview | 4908 5900

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Throat Scope founder Jennifer Holland shines on the US stage as her medical device company seeks to strengthen its market presence there ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Ambition: Throat Scope founder Jennifer Holland in Newcastle. Picture: Marina Neil

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You are the first Australian female to win a silver gong at the US-based Edison awards – honouring excellence in product development – for Throat Scope. What does the win mean to you?

It was an honour to win an Edison Award in New York. The award attracts some of the biggest companies in the world, like 3M and Phillips. To be recognised at this level was an amazing achievement for us.

You invented Throat Scope in 2009 after taking your child to the doctor’s and he was in pain during a mouth examination. How has the potential for the use of your product grown since then?

I designed Throat Scope to replace the penlight and wooden tongue depressor. Doctors, dentists, paediatricians, speech pathologists and paramedics now use Throat Scope. Throat Scope makes it possible to check for sore throats, sore teeth, and mouth ulcers at home. We also want to shine light on the importance of monthly self Oral Health Checks. We’re on a mission to educate the world on the early signs of Oral Cancer. Self-examination will save lives.

Your first brush with success was going on Channel 10’s Shark Tank program and landing a financial backer in tech start up multimillionaire Steve Baxter. Is he still invested in your company?

Steve has played a large part in the Throat Scope journey. His advice is invaluable. He is still an investor in Throat Scope.

Since your appearance on Shark Tank, what have been the biggest coups for your company?

In 17 months, we’ve secured 12 distributors across 146 countries. Team Medical Supplies is one of our largest deals to date, marketing and distributing Throat Scope in Australia. We’ve set up a new warehouse in Ohio in the USA, so we can ship direct to the US. We have three new US distributors and that number is growing.

How has the focus of your business changed since its inception and are there any new markets you envisage for Throat Scope?

Throat Scope provides medical professionals with an Easy, Fast and Accurate view of the mouth, throat, teeth, gums and soft tissue. Now we want to educate everyone about the benefits of at-home, monthly oral health self-checks. If a mole changes colour or shape we know to see a doctor. The early signs of oral cancer are also simple to detect but nobody knows what to look for. Throat Scope is partnering worldwide with Oral Cancer Foundations to educate everyone on the early signs.

What does an average day entail for you?

Most nights I have one or two calls to the US. I start my morning about 4:30am to get some work in before the children wake and also to coincide with US hours. I jump on the treadmill to run for 20 minutes and read emails. When the children wake, I’m in mum mode, getting breakfast, making lunches, dressing them, last minute homework, bags packed and then school drop off for three of my four children. With my fourth child in tow I head into the office for the day and leave about 2:55pm to do school pick up. I’m with the children in the afternoon, taxiing everyone to after school sports and dance. Then its homework, dinner, bath, books, bed and back to work for another couple of hours. My life is crazy but somehow it works. I love Sunday; I switch off and spend quality time with my family.

What are your current business goals?

The goal for Throat Scope and Holland Healthcare is to invent and develop revolutionary medical devices for the healthcare and home market. In 5 years our business will be on par with some of the leading global medical device companies.

What other medical devices are you working on?

We’ll soon be launching the Throat Scope App for parents and healthcare professionals. We’re also working on two new medical devices due out in 2018.

What drives you?

My motivation and drive come from my children. I want them to understand the importance of hard work, persistence and above all I want them to believe in themselves and have the confidence and courage to follow their dreams.

What is the biggest challenge to your business?

Challenges are part of growing, building and learning in business. A challenge for us now is the US company set up; finding the right staff, setting up the warehouse and office to run efficiently, and the intercompany transactions between home and the US.

What is the best part?

Definitely donating Throat Scope to doctors overseas who complete aid work in third world countries. I hope to one day go over and experience this first hand.

You have four young children and a hubby who is away a lot for work. What are your survival tools?

Becoming a mother during my start-up journey gave me all the skills, patience and perseverance I needed to succeed as an entrepreneur. Let’s face it; negotiating with a sick toddler at 3:00am is tough. If you survive that you can do anything.

Jennifer Holland

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‘Bills included’: Tent in Sydney backyard advertised for $130 a week ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Sydney rents rise at fastest rate since 2011 in ‘worrying’ trendMore ‘rent bidding’ apps to launch in Australia as rental revolution looms’Startling’ study shows long-term tenants going to extremes to make ends meet

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Renters might be used to forking out big bucks to live in inner-city Sydney, but their resolve was seriously put to the test on Wednesday when a tent in a Sydenham backyard was advertised for rent at $130 a week.

Don’t worry, Sydneysiders still have some sense of a fair deal and outrage quickly ensued.

The ad, which was swiftly shared on platforms such as Reddit, stated a $200 bond would also be required and noted potential housemates would have to help keep the house clean and do the washing up.

“Includes all bills and $100/week of communal food that you can add to at your leisure,” the post stated.

“We are also part of a vege (sic) box collective.”

“You would have to be quite clean and taken on responsibilities for cleaning in the house…”

Unfortunately for the person who posted the ad, rather than being inundated with requests to move in, Facebook users quickly slammed the entrepreneurial scheme.

The ‘property’ was also advertised on Airbnb at $36 a night with positive reviews, one noting that the hosts were so friendly the guests had extended their trip from two nights to a week. That listing was also taken down on Wednesday.

It’s not the first time a Sydneysider has tried to make the most of unused spaces. A man living in the nearby inner west suburb of Newtown paid $215 a week to rent a balcony back in 2013.

And it’s not too surprising with Sydney’s median house rent now at $550 a week, and units sitting at $530 a week.

The tent’s listing on Airbnb.

In the 12 months to March, Sydney’s median asking house rent increased by $25, or 4.8 per cent, the biggest annual hike in five years.

Just under 2230 properties in the Sydney and Illawarra area are affordable for people on a minimum wage, according to a recent Anglicare report. That’s about 15 per cent of properties, compared to 17.7 per cent a year ago.

A recently released study found 42 per cent of long-term renters surveyed were struggling due to a shortage of funds, and one fifth had sought assistance from parents or friends.

There are also concerns that the launch of two rent-bidding apps, Life Offer and Rentberry, will exacerbate the situation. I mean, I’d pay $130 to live in a tent in Coogee – but Sydenham?? Flat out ridiculous.??? Jules LeFevre (@jules_lefevre) May 10, 2017

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Balancing comfort and style in a family home ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Leaf through any home decor magazine, scroll through home real estate sites, or perhaps an Instagram account of an interior designer and it’s likely you’ll see immaculate spaces, free of clutter, where every piece is well thought out and in its place. Walk into any family home in real life and it’s quite often the opposite. Can you have a home that is both stylish and comfortable? Or do you have to sacrifice one for the other?

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Richard Misso, from interior design company The Stylesmiths, knows how to balance style, comfort and functionality.

“Understanding how a family lives helps us respond with well thought out design solutions that satisfy our clients’ comfort needs,” he says.

“We try to find out if they like to lay across the sofa or sit upright, do they like to elevate their feet? Do they require back support? Do the kids like to sit on the floor? Do they require an adult zone that reflects calm and peace?”

The Stylesmiths recently helped transform an original 1940s dark and disjointed home in Sydney’s eastern suburbs into a family home for four with plenty of space and style.

“There was a strict budget in place with a brief to be very functional yet look good,” says Misso. “In keeping with a beachside feel, everything was kept light and bright in the interior with a bold exterior, navy contrasted crisply with white trims. The neutral palette of concrete floors and blonde timbers could then lend itself to pops of colour through artwork and furniture.

“Subtle features throughout included handmade ceramic tiles to the kitchen splashback and feature pendant lighting to the kitchen and master bedroom.”

The Stylesmiths captured the essence of laid back beachside chic that responded to the young family’s needs and style.

It’s about the details, both overt and covert. A balance between the two makes for a successful interior and cohesive home,” says Misso.

“Hidden or secondary details bring all the elements together connecting the furnishings, paint, surfaces, artwork and lighting; a good example of hidden details is good lighting versus harsh lighting.”

Of course, it’s not just the look at the interior design stage. A home’s functionality, style and comfort have to be considered in the very early stages of planning, and for the home-dweller it might not be immediately obvious what these designs are.

Japanese developers Sekisui House are designing homes with smart floor plans that cater to families.

“We consider how people move about the house,” says Takao Sawai, head of corporate marketing, Australia. “And position particular areas in close proximity to each other to provide comfort and convenience for residents.”

If you’ve just parked your car in the garage after shopping for groceries, for example, their homes provide direct access to the pantry to get everything inside with minimal fuss.

“It’s those sort of little ideas that make a big difference,” says Sawai.

Their way of looking at the housing affordability issue is that you don’t need to sacrifice comfort and design with a smaller floor plan; instead, it can be used to maximum efficiency.

An example is the inclusion of study zones within a central location in the home, instead of being tucked away in a back room.

“A feature of our study nooks is a lower wall height that encourages closeness with children, it provides more family time,” says Sawai.

The company’s development and research team continually measure feedback from their customers to ensure future designs continue to evolve.

“There’s a lot of nice architecture in the world but is it really useable?” he says.

“We are not a company that designs just for aesthetics or just for functionality. We combine lifestyle, safety, style and comfort; somewhere you might want to live for life.”

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Newcastle Jets: Ben Kantarovski survives A-League player cleanoutpoll ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Kantarovski survives Jets cleanout LAST MAN STANDING: Ben Kantarovski has been offered a one-year contract extension at the Jets. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

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SCHOLARSHIP OFFER: Kristian Brymora

OUT: Andrew Hoole

OUT: Daniel Mullen

OUT: Mateo Poljak

OUT: Ma Leilei

OFF-FIELD OPTION: Labinot Haliti

OUT: Morten Nordstrand

MARINERS MOVE: Ben Kennedy

OUT: Tomislav Arcaba

OUT: Harry Sawyer

OUT: Joel Allwright

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facebookSHAREtwitterTWEETemailwhatsappcommentCommentsThe Newcastle Jets have cleared the decks for the Ernie Merrick era, telling eight off-contract players they are not wanted for next season.

Merrick, who was appointed as the club’s new head coach on Tuesday, has run an eye over the A-League squad with Lawrie McKinna and football operations manager Joel Griffiths.

The result is that versatile midfielder Ben Kantarovski is the only man left standing out of 10 players coming off contract, although teenagestriker Kristian Brymora has been offered a scholarship.

It is understood popular striker Labinot Haliti may be offered an off-field role with the club, but local product Andrew Hoole, defender Daniel Mullen, visa player Mateo Poljak, Danish striker Morten Nordstrand, back-up keeper Tomislav Arcaba and Chinese attacker Ma Leilei will not return.

Goalkeeper Ben Kennedy, on the comeback trail from a ruptured Achilles, agreed to terms with the Central Coast Mariners in March, but that deal has not yet been finalised.

Neither towering young Queensland striker Harry Sawyer, who has reached the end of his scholarship deal, nor former Adelaide NPL player Joel Allwright, who is on a short-term contract, are in the club’s plans for next season.

The cleanout means the Jets have 17 contracted players, plus Kantarovski if he accepts the offer of a one-year contract extension, leaving five vacancies for new players.

Kantarovski’s wage lies outside the salary cap under the A-League’s concession for club loyalty.

The Jets have signed Mariners striker Roy O’Donovan, Melbourne Victory defender Daniel Georgevski, who won the Joe Marston Medal as player of the match in Sunday’s grand final, and youngsters Kosta Petratos and Mario Shabow for next season.

It is understood club management have drawn up a list of potential recruits which includes 31-year-old Socceroo Mark Milligan, who is halfway through a two-year contract at Baniyas SC in the United Arab Emirates, and former Jets forward Nathan Burns.

Also mentioned as possible targetsare 28-year-old Wanderers midfielder Mitch Nichols, Victory’s 31-year-old Spanishcentre back Alan Baro, Adelaide midfielder Marcelo Carrusca and former Wellington Phoenix keeper Glenn Moss.

Meanwhile, Queensland winger Joe Champness, one of two youth players the Jets sent to Portugal this year to develop their games, has earned a trial with Brighton and Hove Albion’s under-23s.Brighton won promotion from the English Championship to the Premier League last month.

Champness, a former Roar youth player, has not played for the Jets but signed an 18-month scholarship deal with the club in January before joining Portuguese club Academica on loan with Antonee Burke.

In other news, Spanish coach Guillermo Amor has left Adelaide after the Reds finished ninth this season.

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Whatever suits in battle to dress up ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

FASHION DARTBOARD: Statistics suggest that when it comes to selecting a suit it’s all in the eye of the beholder.SIMON WALKER: That’s Life archive

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Buying a suit for a pressing social engagement is a fashion crisis we all face at some stage of life. Usually the last minute.

Generally the experience is graphic, so in an effort to encapsulate, and indeed pixelate, the factors at play, I’ve come up with a graph (see right).

You’ll notice a slight gender bias, and that the criteria are vague and the percentages don’t add up. Welcome to fashion. Invert to to your needs as we dive deep into the data.

To put you in the picture, we’d been invited to a wedding weeks ago and we/I obviously needed some new clothes.

To quote the treasurer, “better days ahead”.The oldfallback of recycling what’s in the wardrobe, yet again, had been rejected. We/I needed to regenerate fashionistically. But why rush into it? Cue the last minute.

So we’re fashion in the field, hitting the change rooms like Australia’s Next Top Model, not. Clothes of various ill-fitting fabric, texture, length and style are being flungat pace in the face. The Met ball has nothing on some of the garb beingparaded.

Legs aren’t long enough, cuffs aren’t peaking out, shoulders are too puffy and eyes are getting that way too.

One of them’son the mirror checking the crotch, the other’s on the partner who has a kind of “over it” look on theface.

There’s a lot of intel to take in. The lighting’s poor. The music’s loud. The sales assistant has stopped asking my opinion and is communicating directly to the partner. And we’ve only just got here.

It feels likeI am being accessorised, and I have to say, it’s dehumanising. “Now you see what we go through!!!” exclaims the partner.

In that moment I am able to distil the four major ingredients that influencea man when it comes to selecting a suit. And you’ll see that none of them really count until you get to the last one.

Starting in descending order of importance, colour.

Worth 10 per cent of worry afterRobbie O gave us mustard yellow. Then there’s undertaker black, accountant grey and poo brown. Say no more. That is until you discover that the new black this year is blue.

Which is how the ego feels as I don a flecked and textured borderline cobalt number, copping in the process an observation from sassy second shop assistant that this style is really “common”.

I think he meant “popular”, but itcame across as aninsensitive thing to say, particularly to the second shop assistant who thought I wasabout to pull out of the sale.

It was touch and go, but we are now up tothe third most important point on the graph –the suit nearly fits.

Definitely worth another 10 per cent of fretting, particularly after three hours of squeezing into and out of all manner of neck-choking, gut-pinching, derma-braising combos.

Which gets us to the second most important thing,timing. The wedding is basically tomorrow and the shops are nearly shut.This is definitely worth worrying about unless you want to turn up to the ceremony nude.

Which heraldsthe ultimate factor that undoes all other considerations – does the partner like it?

Hard to tell as theyslump in the corner. But with one last effort thethumb comes up. We have a winner –my credit card company. Good debt or bad debt? Let the wedding snaps decide.

In the meantime I’m dressing this up as a graphic relief.

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In Her Time on trial in Doomben 10,000 for longer interstate campaign ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

BEN Smith believes In Her Time’s hit’n’run shot at the Doomben 10,000 will point to alot more than just her next Brisbane carnival target.

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PRIMED: Josh Parr, driving In Her Time to victory in the Millie Fox Stakes at Rosehill, will ride her on Saturday. Picture: bradleyphotos苏州美甲学校苏州美甲学校网

The Newcastle trainer’s stable star will resume in the $700,000 group 1 over 1200 metres on Saturday, and the race will double as a trial of her travelling capabilities.

The four-year-old mare has notraced outside of Sydney and the Central Coast and Smith was keen to “test the waters”. In Her Time made the float trip to Queensland on Wednesday night and she was returning home after the race despite plans to run her again north of the border.

“She’s never had to travel before so we’re going up and back for this one to see if she can handle it and see if she’s up to group 1 level,” Smith said. “That will decide where we go.If she runs really well, we’ll look at the [$1.5 million] Stradbrokeand if not we’ll go to the [$200,000] Dane Ripper [both June 10 at Eagle Farm].

“We’re also looking at it as a guide to whether we take her to Melbourne for races in the spring and what we do in the autumn.”

In Her Time won back-to-back group 2 races –the Breeders Classic and Millie Fox Stakes –in February beforefifth on group 1 debut in the Coolmore Classic.

She won a trial at Wyong on May 1 but will hit the Doomben 10,000 first-up from a two-month let-up. Smith said a more patient approach, compared to his early days with the horse, paid off last preparation.

“She seems to race pretty well fresh,” Smith said of the winner of five from 11 starts.

“We’ve learned to space her runs. We’ve spelled her a couple of times, and we’ve tried a couple of places, but shenever spells well.We’re going to have to handpick her races, poke along and keep her fresh and happy.”

In Her Time, with Josh Parr again on board, will startfrom barrier 12of 14 on Saturday. Smith hoped the draw meant hissuccessful front-runner, a $21 shot with TAB Fixed Odds on Friday,could find cover.

“I don’t think it will bother her too much,” Smithsaid of the wide barrier. “There’s obviously speed inside us and it will probably just allow us to do our own thing.She’s good out of the gates and can put herself into a race. She can sit just off them.

“Redzel and Russian Revolution are going to go quite hard, and there are your backmarkers, so it looks like we should be able to put ourselves where we want.Josh has ridden her different ways in trials as well and she’s shown she’s adaptable.

“She’s keen in her work and Josh was very happy with heron Tuesday.She’s taken great improvement from her trial. We’ve got to test the waters at some point and this is a good test for her.”

Smith was also keen to see In Her Time perform again at group 1 level after a luckless effort inthe Coolmore.

“It was a solid run but we were a bit disappointed,” he said.

“If we’d been able to get out when Josh wanted her to, we would have finished much closer.

“She had the wind taken out of her, trying to get out around the 600 and the 450 again. That’s when they started to quicken, and it’s hard in any race to get going again from that.But she held on well, I thought.

“Stretching out to 1500, she needed everything to go right.”

He was confident of a better display with In Her Time dropping back in distance.

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