Monthly Archives:September 2019

Budget housing affordability measures a ‘help’ to East Maitland first home buyers, but calls for reduction in stamp duty. ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Every bit helps.

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That was the verdictfrom Hunter first home buyers on Wednesday, as they welcomednews they will be able to access tax breaks to help them save for a deposit.

SAVINGS MOUNTAIN: East Maitland couple Codie Ellicott and Tae Rowsell are struggling to meet the costs of a first home deposit. They say it will be ‘tricky’, even with the tax breaks announced in the budget. Picture: Perry Duffin

But forCodie Ellicott and Tae Rowsell, pulling together the funds to buy in their hometown of East Maitland remainsa daunting prospect.

“I’ve been working full time for three years and my partner for six or seven years,” Ms Ellicott said. “We’ve been saving throughout, but it’s really hard…the investors can usually offer a higher bid than you.”

Under changes announced in the federal budget, from July first home buyers will be able to salary sacrifice up to $30,000 into super for a deposit.

They will be able to withdraw the money from July 2018.

Retirees will be able to divert up to $300,000 from the sale of their family home to superannuation, encouraging them to downsize. Those incentives will come into effect from July 2018.

Agent Chad Dunn of Century 21 Novocastrian said the changes could result in “decent” savings for young buyers, particularly those in the highest marginal tax bracket.

He predicted there could be a short-term cooling in the market while they took advantage of the changes.

“I had 50 groups through a home on Saturday and easily half of those were first home buyers,” he said.

“I think you will see first home buyers go out of the market and stockpile more funds through this system, and probably come back next year.”

Mr Dunn said the changes for retirees could be a “gamechanger”by bringing a surgeof new stock to the market. But he believes it would have been preferableto introduce the changes immediately, rather than waiting for 12 months.

“Right now we have a really limited amount of stock on the market…those stock levels will certainly change next year when that ruling takes place.”

However according to Mr Dunn, one of the biggest pressures on young buyers was overlooked.

“I still believe stamp duty is tipping the scale,” he said. “They’re missing the third prong.”

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What first home buyers should know before investing in Scott Morrison’s scheme ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Finally.

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After missing out on a free education, tax-free property windfalls and the chance to pour tens of thousands of dollars into super almost tax-free, young Australians have finally been thrown a tax break bone.

Sure, it’s more chicken wing than femur. But it’s worth considering for anyone looking to buy a home in coming years.

The First Home Super Saver Scheme unveiled on Tuesday night is expected to deliver first home savers a total tax break of $50 million in the coming financial year, rising to an annual break worth $70 million in four years.

A first home saver who earns $60,000 a year and ploughs $10,000 a year into the scheme for three years will be about $6000 better off than if they’d simply put their money into a bank deposit – the typical first home buyer strategy.

If that doesn’t sound like much moolah to you, you’re probably wasting too much money on smashed avo.

The scheme is unlikely to have a noticeable impact on boosting home ownership rates. By putting more money into borrower’s pockets without also increasing supply, the measure will likely add to home price pressures.

But compared to recent price movements, it’s just a drop in the ocean.

Sydney median dwelling prices jumped $120,000 over the year ended April to $860,000 – a weekly increase of about $2300 a week. Melbourne prices also leapt $100,000 over the year to $650,000 – a little under $2000 a week.

By topping up first time buyer accounts by about $2000 a year, ScoMo’s FHSSS keeps them ahead of the Sydney and Melbourne property markets by about a week.

Still, $6000 is $6000.

So how can first home savers get a bit of that action?

From 1 July 2017, first home savers can instruct their employer to deposit money from their pre-tax income into their super account, where it will be taxed at just 15 per cent instead of the usual marginal tax rates that would apply, currently at 19, 32, 37 and 45 per cent (plus the Medicare levy).

For someone earning between $80,001 and $180,000 on the 37 cent marginal rate, they get a tax saving of 22 cents in the dollar. Instead of pocketing just $6300 in after-tax income from the last $10,000 they earn, they’ll get to keep $8500 and put it into super.

CLICK HERE TO USE THE FHSSS ESTIMATOR AND FIND OUT HOW MUCH YOU COULD GET

Earnings generated on this money while in the super account will also be taxed at the low rate of 15 per cent, compared to paying the full whack of marginal tax on interest earned on bank savings.

The scheme maxes out at a total of $30,000 in contributions per individual and the maximum that can be salary sacrificed in any year is $15,000.

When the time comes to live out the great Aussie dream and buy a home, savers will pay tax on their withdrawal amount at their marginal rate, less 30 percentage points. For a person on the 37 cent rate, they pay just 7 cents. That’s not quite the tax-free withdrawals enjoyed by over 60s from super, but it ain’t bad.

All up, a person earning $100,000 a year who puts $10,000 a year into the scheme for three years would end up with $24,777 to put towards their home deposit, versus just $18,586 if they put their money in a bank deposit. They’d end up paying an average tax rate of 17 per cent, versus 38 per cent.

On the face of it, that’s worth doing.

But there are several things to consider first.

First, and obviously, you have to have the cash to spare. While for higher income earners, this may be a good forced-savings method, low income earners are less likely to have the spare cash. If they do, however, it will be worthwhile, their contributions being essentially tax-free thanks to the low income super tax offset.

Second, you may not be able to squirrel away as much as you think. Importantly, the usual caps on concessional contributions to super apply. From 1 July this year, that’s a maximum of $25,000 in contributions a year – both voluntary and compulsory – which attract the low tax rates. Anyone earning $106,000 or above will already have compulsory contributions of $10,000 and more a year, meaning they can put in less than the scheme maximum of $15,000 a year.

Another kink is that if you earn more than $250,000 you pay an extra 15 cents on your contributions, bringing tax to 30 cents. I know. Cry me a river.

It’s also important to know that, once in, your money can’t be withdrawn for other purposes. If you do not ever buy a home, the money has to sit there until you reach retirement age. If you do decide to buy, however, you can access the funds after a year.

It’s not entirely clear, however, how this will work.

While super funds hold your money, the scheme is administered by the Tax Office, which must calculate how much you can withdraw. How will this work? Will buyers need to show the ATO proof of purchase before accessing funds? If so, how can they get approved for a loan?

A final kink in the scheme is the fixed rate of return savers will get on their money.

To provide certainty, and to save super funds the hassle of calculating actual individual returns, money put into the scheme will be deemed to have returned 3 per cent plus the 90 day bank bill rate each year. Currently, that’s around 4.78 per cent.

If your super fund returns more than that, that excess will just have to stay in your retirement nest egg.

If your super fund performs worse, or even shrinks, the extra amount needed to pay out the deemed rate will be deducted from your retirement nest egg – possibly at a time of depressed values which is exactly when you should leave the money there to recover.

Investing in shares, which super funds do, is best done over the long run, and savers risk falling foul in the short term.

Overall, however, history suggests savers should enjoy a higher average returns on their money in super than a typical bank deposit rate.

Worth considering.

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World Rugby toughen eligibility laws but Tongan Thor free to play ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

World Rugby has announced players across the globe will now have to serve a five-year eligibility period before they can represent a national side. But a delay in its implementation until 2020 will allow Queensland Reds prop Taniela Tupou – known as the “Tongan Thor” – to be eligible for Wallabies selection this year.

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World Rugby executives met in Tokyo to discuss the Regulation 8 guidelines that relate to player eligibility.

A decision to extend the residency requirement from 36 months to 60 months was made with the intention of “protecting the integrity and sanctity of international rugby in the modern elite environment”.

It means players will find it significantly tougher to switch allegiances, however the increase to five years will not come into effect until December 31, 2020.

“This extension to the residency period within a forward-thinking reform package will ensure a close, credible and established link between a union and players, which is good for rugby and good for fans,” said World Rugby chairman Bill Beaumont.

Australian Rugby Union chief executive Bill Pulver was opposed to the change as recently as last year, saying he felt the tweak would leave rugby vulnerable to having players poached by a code such as rugby league that did not have complicated international eligibility rules.

But Pulver changed his tune this year, stressing the move from three years to five would have little impact on the Wallabies.

“At a World Rugby level, what we’re trying to do is to preserve the integrity of national teams,” Pulver said in February. “Frankly, if you are a Fijian that lives in Fiji, you should play for Fiji … you shouldn’t play for any other country. Same in Tonga, same in Samoa, same right around the world. It’s very important we preserve that.

“We support this change. It is a very healthy international change. Of the last 90 players that have used the residency rule to play for Australia, only two have used the 36-month residency rule.”

The two players are Fijian born Sefa Naivalu, who made his debut off the bench last year in Pretoria against South Africa, and 11-Test winger Henry Speight from the Brumbies.

As for 20-year-old rising star Tupou, he will not be affected by the changes but will still have to serve the mandatory three-year requirement.

Tupou is eligible for Wallabies selection later this year after being picked on the spring tour at the end of 2016 as a development player.

For some time, France and Argentina have pushed for five-year eligibility requirements in the hope of preventing national sides from plucking players from other nations and getting them into their systems quickly.

Argentina were the only side at the 2015 World Cup with an entire squad of locally-born players.

World Rugby vice-chairman Agustin Pichot, who hails from Argentina, lauded the decision on Wednesday.

“This is an historic moment for the sport and a great step towards protecting the integrity, ethos and stature of international rugby,” Pichot said. “National team representation is the reward for devoting your career, your rugby life, to your nation and these amendments will ensure that the international arena is full of players devoted to their nation, who got there on merit.”

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Living green in the city ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

House of the Week | Newcastle | Photos TweetFacebook House of the Week | Newcastle | Gallery One man’s inner-city tree house. Photos: Chris Brown+12One man’s inner-city tree house. Photos: Chris BrownMORE GALLERIES

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facebookSHAREtwitterTWEETemailwhatsappChris Brown admits: “I have a bit of a plant problem”.

He first moved into what he and his friends have dubbed “the tree house” two years ago when he learned another friend was moving out.

“I instantly pounced on the opportunity,” Brown, 30, says of the space.

“I’m still here because my indoor plants all grow so well.”

The artist and permaculture enthusiast is a born and bred Novocastrian. He’s an active citizen in Newcastle. He works in community service and regularly volunteers, getting his hands dirty in community gardens.

His apartment, which he shares with a housemate, is in Cliff Towers in Newcastle’sChurch Street. The art deco building was built in 1935. He believes the apartments once served as accommodation for doctors who worked at Royal Newcastle Hospital.

The two-bedroom apartment is brimming with natural light and interesting things. It is undoubtedly the space of creative individuals.

From the jars of homemade kombucha being brewed above the fridge to the colourful milk crates, op-shop crocheted blankets and a variety of plants, this is a home that welcomes without pretension.

“I don’t like bare walls,” he says.

“I like to fill every nook and cranny and I’m constantly rearranging. If I get a new piece of art or plant I completely rearrange.”

Outside his kitchen is the fire escape, which also happens to have a peaceful view of the harbour.

His lounge room is the space he speaks most about. It’s a room with a sweeping view through the treetops in Church Walk Park.

His thriving plants are an indicator of just how much sunlight the west-facing room enjoys.

Brown is interested in the relationships between people and plants and how people engage with them.

For him, plants are an art form. Many of his plants have a backstory, and Brown’s passion for permaculture and gardening is personal.

“It all started when I was a child. I learned about gardening from my mother. We would grow snapdragons, petunias and geraniums. She passed away when I was 11, and I forgot about it,” Brown says.

Later, when he was at uni, he found a house with a large backyard full of similar flowers and a big orange tree. All the memories came flooding back and a love for plants was immediately rekindled.

Now, in his home, some of the plants are living memories.

When Brown’s grandfather passed away, he dug up some soil from his backyard and potted and watered it. The soil grew into a fairy grass plant and has thrived ever since. Brown says the plant even reminds him of his grandfather’s white wiry beard. There’s a similar story in a plant cutting he took from his mother’s home after she passed away. Since then, it’s grown into its own and thrives as a reminder of her.

A long, thin cactus spreads across a wall, creating a wild desert vibe within the plant haven. Many of his plants were originally cuttings he received from friends, and much of the artwork in the house was given to him, including paintings from his grandmother.

He doesn’t like to buy things new. His decor in the home is mainly from second-hand shops or gifts from friends. Most of the furniture in the lounge room was found on the side of the road.

“I don’t find new things interesting. I like things that are old and damaged and quirky,” he says.

While Brown doesn’t own any land himself, he says he will always find ways to grow. He coordinated the Habitat In Harmony community garden in Belmont, and he volunteers there regularly. His partner and brother live nearby, and he believes he’ll live in Newcastle forever. He feels deeply invested in the community. He’s clearly dedicated to his creative space at home too.

From each plant’s story to the intense sunlight and the interesting op shop odds and ends, what the tree house lacks in sophistication it makes up for in personality. Its natural quirky style is unforgettable.

Have a home that could feature in Weekender? We’d love to see it. [email protected]苏州美甲学校苏州美甲学校网.

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Where did the name Bulls Garden Road come from ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

EXOTIC: Visitors to Mr Bull’s Gardens pose for this 19th century Lake Macquarie Library photo. Photo: history.lakemac苏州美甲学校苏州美甲学校网BULLS Garden Road near Charlestown is very familiar to most Lake Macquarie people. But what’s the real story behind it?

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Believe it or not, more than 100 years ago this road going south, off Dudley Road, went to Mr Bull’s famous exotic gardens, hidden in bush.

Today, this major tourist attraction has long disappeared. The road winds for about two kilometres from near Whitebridge Cemetery to link with Oakdale Road at Gateshead.

Best known as a traffic shortcut, it’s also the road where the landmark O’Malleys aquariums does business.

What is normally forgotten these days is that around 1860 Edmund Bull bought a 60-acre plot here, in what is now Whitebridge, to gradually create a botanical paradise.

Eight of his children worked on rotation in the gardens initially. Two brothers at a time, as young as 14 years, were left alone in the bush for a fortnight, clearing the land.

Here, they lived on corn beef, tea, flour and sugar supplemented by what they could catch, such as possums, pigeons, parrots and bandicoots.

At night, there were the haunting cries of dingoes stalking their young cattle, some of which by morning would be without their tails.

Gradually, over decades, the cleared bush developed into some of the finest gardens in Australia. Now, after land changes, only the name Bulls Garden Road stands as a reminder of past glories.

Some of the garden splendour, however, survived until at least 1936.

Lake Macquarie City librarians today believe Mr Bull’s Gardens were located east of Whitebridge’s present Bulls Garden Road. Part of the road though outlines the boundary of the original land grant.

A gully of running water once cut through the land, creating a large rock pool, or miniature lake, leading to a waterfall. On the hills, an orchard was planted to obtain a livelihood, but the rest was moulded into a ‘hobby’ scenic garden.

Many seeds and plants largely unknown then in Australiawere planted. There were seeds from America and Java and bulbs from Holland, plus 24 varieties of camellia from Japan.

The cool gully full of palms, big ferns, staghorns and fat clumps of cane was beautifully landscaped, terraced by tiers of stonewalls. Rockpools and a row of fishponds under a great coral tree completed the picture.

Both Edmund and his second wife, Mary, were later buried at nearby Whitebridge Cemetery, in 1899 and 1903 respectively.

But it was a son, Sid Bull, who did much to create the legend as we know it today. Sid, who took over management of the attraction in 1904,allowed free public access to the gardens where his family lived on site and made a good living supplying refreshments, flowers and fruit to visitors.

People caught the train to then nearby Whitebridge station. Hundreds of people flocked to the gardens each weekend or on holidays.

There were once as many as 200 horse-carriages at a time pulled up on the grass outside.

Masters of sailing ships anchored in Newcastle Harbour who had heard of the beauty of the gardens hired buggies to make a special trip to the area.

Here, beside the waterfall was a small mine from which the Bull family collected coal.

Visiting the site in 1947, Herald writer Ian Healy reported only remnants of the gardens remained between plots of sub-divided land. He then heard tales of ships’ captains who once liked to creep into the mine, with picks, to chip off small pieces “which they treasured like gold”.

One of the greatest threats to the site were occasional bush fires. Early model cars then bought visitors in bigger numbers to the gardens and thefts of flowers and fruit increased.

Mr Bull’s gardens, which had once grown all tropical fruit from paw paws, pineapples and mangoes to tulips and violets, closed in the 1930s after about 70 years.

Sidney Bull and his wife then relocated from Whitebridge to Wallsend in 1937.

His father, pioneer Edmund Bull who had come to NSW in 1837, was from a long line of gardeners who had cultivated plants in Scotland and the Isle of Wight for several hundred years.

At first he lived at Folly Park, Mayfield, in 1854 before the industries came. Bull Street was named after him.

Sidney Bull said later that his father had grown the first bananas in Newcastle, but “nobody would buy them . . . the majority of people were suspicious of their taste and worth”.

The family then eventually moved to remote Whitebridge and the rest is history.

Linking the pastWELL, well. It’s not often you learn something new about local history.

It all started when author Doug Saxon, of Fishing Point, dropped me a note recently.

FORGOTTEN FIGURE: Michael Scott, pictured around 1940.

“I’m emailing you to let you know that, after three years of research, my book, Michael Scott. An Artistic Life, has finally been printed,” he wrote.

“The final product is 162 pages (A4) with some 90 photographs.

“You’re probably never heard of Michael Scott, but in the 1950s and 1960s he was well known throughout Australia, particularly as the founder of the Blake Prize for religious art.

“He also had strong connections to the Hunter – his father was medical superintendent at the Morisset Hospital and his uncle and benefactor was AA Rankin after whom Rankin Park Hospital and the adjoining suburb are named.”

According to Saxon, Scott was also a significant figure in changing Australian church architecture in the late 1950s and 1960s.

It turns out that Scott was also a newspaper columnist, radio broadcaster and lecturer on both religious art and church architecture while holding office in a number of church, government and community organisations.

In 1946, Scott was the first public figure to call for state aid for Catholic schools.

Author Saxon’s interest in Scott began after being appointed principal of Bonnells Bay Primary School (formerly Morisset East Public) on the western shore of Lake Macquarie, in January 1983.

Here, he received a letter from Michael Scott of Dublin, Ireland, seeking information about the school he attended from 1915 to 1917.

Michael Scott planned to write an account of his “incredibly happy days in the little (Morisset) bush school”.

Then in 2012, when Saxon set out to write the school’s centenary history, he found the letter sent to him 30 years earlier.

Saxon’s follow-up research uncovered that Scott had become orphaned at age 12 and had later become a Catholic priest.

At age 17, he gave up the opportunity to be a lawyer to become a Jesuit instead, fuelled by a sense of obligation to help those who’d helped his family. Intrigued, Saxon set out on the path to discover more.

This included that in 1968, Michael Scott became the first Australian Jesuit to leave to marry a woman he’d met in Dublin and fallen in love with almost 40 years earlier.

Saxon’s self-funded book ($30) is being launched on Saturday, May 13, at Adamstown Uniting Church.

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Keith William Green granted bail over Maryville peeping tom allegations ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Man arrested wearing bra BAIL: Keith William Green is mobbed my the media after being released from the Newcastle courthouse cells on Wednesday afternoon.

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FREE: Keith William Green is mobbed my the media after being released from the Newcastle courthouse cells on Wednesday afternoon.

TweetFacebook BAIL: Keith William Green is mobbed my the media after being released from the Newcastle courthouse cells on Wednesday afternoon. +2MORE GALLERIES

facebookSHAREtwitterTWEETemailwhatsappAN accused Peeping Tom allegedly found inside a woman’s home at Maryville on Tuesday night was wearing blue women’s underpants and a bra and was carrying a pile of women’s clothes and a black wig when he was arrested, court documents state.

Police allege he had “ratchet tie-down straps” secured around his neck with cable ties. The straps were secured down his back and inside his underpants with more cable ties, police said.

Accused Maryville peeping tom Keith William Green is released from custody. Story to come. @newcastleheraldpic.twitter苏州美甲学校/ySqCDoMsvk

— Sam Rigney (@SamRigney) May 10, 2017

Keith William Green, 55, of Raymond Terrace, appeared in Newcastle Local Court in handcuffs, a pair of green prison-issue shorts and a jumper on Wednesday charged with enter dwelling with intent and peep or pry.

His solicitor, Kristy Wade, pleaded not guilty to both charges and applied for bail on Mr Green’s behalf.

According to a statement of police facts, the alleged victim was at home on Sunday night when she saw a man standing in her backyard.

She grabbed a torch and the man, who was was wearing only a pair of white underpants, fled.

Then on Tuesday night about 11.25pm, the woman was asleep in her unit when she heard someone come in.

She walked into the lounge room and saw a man –wearing nothing but a pair of dark-coloured underpants – standing behind the lounge room door, court documents state.

“The alleged victim noticed that the accused had something protruding from the rear of his head but was unable to describe this object any further,” police facts state.The woman told police she recognised the man from a few nights earlier and told him to leave.The man ran out the front door and the alleged victim called police.

Police patrolled the area and allegedly found Mr Green running along Lewis Street at 11.36pm, court documents state.

At this stage, police allegehe was wearing underpants and a dark jumper and was carrying a bundle of ladies clothes and a black wig.

When police asked about the clothes, Mr Green allegedly said they were his.When asked about the cable ties and ratchet straps, the accused replied: “I don’t know”, court documents state.

Magistrate Robert Stone granted Mr Green bail on the condition he live at Raymond Terrace, report to police, adhere to a curfew, not enter the suburb of Maryville and provide a $1000 surety.

The matter was adjourned until June 22.

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Kasiano could be squeezed out as Bulldogs overhaul roster ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Sam Kasiano could be the first contracted Bulldog to leave Belmore as part of the club’s roster overhaul after Melbourne made a play for the hulking prop.

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The Storm is desperate to bolster its forward pack and have identified Kasiano as the man to help fill the void. The ladder leaders rarely attempt to recruit an established star but are making an exception as they brace for the departure of Blues hopeful Jordan McLean (Cowboys) and Kiwi international Tohu Harris (Warriors) just a year after losing Kevin Proctor to the Gold Coast.

Cooper Cronk’s decision to shift to Sydney also frees up salary cap space for the club to make a play for a big-name forward for the first time since luring Michael Crocker from the Roosters in 2006.

Kasiano is contracted to Canterbury until the end of 2018, but the club will need to shed stars, contracted or otherwise, to refresh its playing list. Coach Des Hasler is keen to retain the New Zealand and Samoan international but something has to give after the club confirmed the signing of Kieran Foran on Wednesday. Kasiano is one of several players on a back-ended deal, meaning his departure could be a win for the Bulldogs and the Storm.

A move south will also give Kasiano the opportunity to start games, a scenario which is no chance of happening when Woods arrives at the “family club” next year. The Bulldogs are unlikely to stand in Kasiano’s way if he is able to secure himself a long-term deal that sets up his future.

Josh Reynolds’ shift to Wests Tigers in 2018 will free up some salary cap space, while Will Hopoate and Michael Lichaa are yet to secure a home for next season. However, Canterbury is facing the prospect of bidding farewell to more players if the NRL doesn’t budge on its initial salary cap proposal to the Rugby League Players’ Association as part of the collective bargaining agreement negotiations.

Skipper James Graham, on a deal worth the best part of $1 million for 2018, has been identified as another player that could be squeezed out. Cashed-up Newcastle is watching the situation with interest after missing out on a number of potential recruits including Matt Scott, Dale Finucane, Matt Prior and Jack Bird. Halfback Moses Mbye has been shopped to rivals, while there has also been conjecture over the future of the Morris twins, Brett and Josh.

The Storm were one of Foran’s suitors, but the New Zealand international chose Canterbury to be closer to his two young children. The Storm have also missed out on Anthony Milford, who has recommitted to the Broncos.

Foran has a strong relationship with Hasler from their time together at Manly and came agonisingly close to rejoining his former mentor the last two times he was off contract.

“I know that family was a determining priority in Kieran’s decision,” Hasler said.

“He could have chosen to go to a handful of Sydney clubs, so we are pleased that he has chosen to continue his career at the Bulldogs.”

The Tigers and Cowboys are both keen on adding Tuimoala Lolohea to their roster immediately and are hopeful the Warriors will grant him an immediate release. The out-of-favour playmaker would slot in for the injured Johnathan Thurston if he shifts to Townsville, while a transfer to the Tigers would allow Mitchell Moses an early move to Parramatta.

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Economics shoots … and scores! ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Imagine Steve Jobs saying the iPhone is useless or Bill Gates recommending that Microsoft Office be thrown out the window.

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Such a bizarre situation exists in the world’s most popular sport, association football (or soccer). And those who saw the nerve-wrecking A-League grand final clash between Sydney FC and Melbourne Victory on Sunday probably sensed that the problem at hand is the penalty shoot-out.

The parallels between the economy and sport are stronger than they seem, and economic research can be useful in both arenas by identifying “welfare-improving” rules and policies.

In 2006, FIFA’s then president, Sepp Blatter, said: “Football World Cup, it is a passion, and when the match goes into extra time, it’s a drama. But when it comes to penalty kicks, it’s a tragedy.”

Blatter’s statement followed the 2006 World Cup final, which featured arch-rivals Italy and France and was decided by a penalty shoot-out. His statement was motivated by the large number of important matches decided in this cruel lottery.

What’s the problem? Blatter’s primary issue was not just the randomness of the shoot-out but that it doesn’t provide a team contest. It also puts extreme pressure on individual penalty takers, who may suffer major psychological trauma if they miss. One may recall the agony and tears of players such as England’s David Beckham, France’s David Trezeguet, Chelsea’s John Terry and, most recently, Melbourne Victory’s Carl Valeri and Marco Rojas, who missed the penalty kicks in Sunday’s grand final.

FIFA’s efforts to reduce the reliance on penalty shoot-outs resulted in adopting the so-called “golden goal” between 1993 and 2002, which meant “sudden death” for the team that first conceded a goal in extra time. The rule tried to ensure that there was more attacking play and thus fewer matches decided in a shoot-out.

The fiasco of this rule did not surprise economists, because they pay attention to the effects of various policies on incentives of economic subjects. It was clear to them that the golden goal not only increased the “reward” for scoring a goal – and therefore incentives for players to attack in extra time – but it also increased the “punishment” for conceding a goal – and therefore incentives to defend. As it turned out, the latter effect was stronger due to a phenomenon known as “loss aversion”, a theory for which Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky received the Nobel prize in economics in 2002. When it became apparent that the golden goal was counterproductive and led to fewer goals in extra time, FIFA abandoned it. How can economics help?

Are there alternatives to the penalty shoot-out that would eliminate the above shortcomings and alleviate the football tragedy? This is where economic research can help, by answering the following question: what would happen if we swapped the extra time and penalty shoot-out around? If, after a tie in regulation time (90 minutes), the shoot-out first took place, and only then did the 30-minute extra time follow? Under this new sequencing the team that scored the most goals in extra time would win – regardless of the outcome of the preceding shoot-out. Only in the event that the extra time ended in a draw would the shoot-out result become relevant and determine the winner of the game.

The positive psychological effects of this change are obvious. The team losing the shoot-out would have an opportunity to sway the match in its favour in the subsequent extra time. If it failed, it would be perceived as a failure of the team, not the individual who missed the 12-yard kick. This would naturally reduce their stress and stigmatisation.

Other effects of the proposed rule change are quantified in my study (with colleagues Liam Lenten from La Trobe University and Petr Stehl??k from University of West Bohemia) published in the Journal of Sports Economics. Our econometric analysis of a large number of football matches shows the proposed move of penalties before extra time would strongly encourage attacking play and increase scoring in extra time. According to our estimates, in competitions such as the World Cup or the European Champions League final, the rule would increase the likelihood of a goal in extra time by 45 to 60 per cent. It would therefore reduce the proportion of tedious games with scoreless extra time by half, from 50 to 25 per cent. It’s because one team would always have an incentive to attack – unlike under the status quo, whereby both teams often defend and wait for the shoot-out.

Our study shows the exact boost in extra-time scoring would depend on many factors, such as the number of goals in regulation time, tournament round, home-ground advantage and relative strength of the teams (which we measure by bookmakers’ odds). Our regression models suggest, for example, that the probability of a goal being scored in extra-time of a World Cup quarterfinal, between two equally favoured opponents tied nil all after regulation time, would increase from the current 35.2 to 61.9 per cent. If this same type of match finished one all after the regulation 90 minutes, the scoring probability would increase from 46 to 72 per cent under the new rule.

Therefore, we hope that, after the successful launch of the goal-line technology and promising trials of video-refereeing, FIFA officials decide to test other football innovations, including the proposed swap of extra time and penalties. It would allow economic research to prevent many future soccer and personal tragedies.

Dr Jan Libich is a senior lecturer in macroeconomics at La Trobe University.

COMMENTS: Comments Closed

Categories: 苏州美甲学校

Open for inspection ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Aberglasslyn9.45am – 10.15am | 18 Lapwing Street | $370,000-$400,000 | 0478 824 290

苏州美甲学校

10.30am – 11.00am | 21 Hibiscus Crescent | $400,000-$430,000 | 0478 824 290

Adamstown11.00am – 11.45am | 20 Olney Road | $585,000 – $615,000 | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 2/3 Fourth Street | $690,000-$740,000 | 0411 843 051

Adamstown Heights10.00am – 10.30am | 14 Randall Parade | Auction | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 22 Montrose Avenue | Auction 20/5/17 | 0410 468 968

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 160 Princeton Avenue | $1,250,000 – $1,375, | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 408, Brunker Road | Auction | 4908 5900

Arcadia Vale11.30am – 12.00pm | 19 Brooks Street | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4959 1466

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 35 Arcadia Street | $460,000 – $490,000 | 4975 1644

Awaba1.00pm – 1.30pm | 24 Wyong Street | AUCTION 27.05.17 | 4959 1466

Barnsley10.00am – 10.30am | 17 Codrington Street | $340,000-$370,000 | 0412 290 452

Belmont9.30am – 10.00am | E201 11 Ernest Street | By Neg $430,000 – $4 | 4945 8600

10.00am – 10.30am | E109 11 Ernest Street | By Neg $415,000 – $4 | 4945 8600

10.00am – 10.30am | 43 Livingstone Street | By Neg $400,000 – $4 | 4945 8600

11.00am – 11.30am | 12 Aylward Street | Auction | 4945 8600

11.00am – 11.30am | 24 Bellevue Road | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

11.00am – 11.30am | 24 George Street | Preview | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.30pm | 88 Ross Street | Auction | 4915 7888

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 19 Deane Street | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 49 Evans Street | $515,000-$540,000 | 0412 290 452

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 403/58 Brooks Parade | $1,100,000 | 4945 8600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 17A Aylward Street | $775,000 – $850,000 | 4903 8228

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 5 Lee Ann Crescent | $795,000 | 4915 7888

3.00pm – 3.30pm | 3 Lewers Street | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

Belmont North10.30am – 11.00am | 5 Kananook Cresent | $599,950 | 4943 6333

11.00am – 11.30am | 28 Leicester Avenue | $515,000 – $535,000 | 4908 5900

11.15am – 11.45am | 41 Camberwarra Drive | $780,000 | 4928 7400

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 69a John Street | $775,000 – $850,000 | 4904 8400

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 2/51 Mirambeena Street | Auction | 4945 8600

Belmont South1.00pm – 1.30pm | 4 McEwan Street | Preview | 4915 7888

Blackalls Park11.00am – 11.30am | 1 Adam Street | $565,000 – $615,000 | 4903 8228

Bolton Point10.00am – 10.30am | 16 Bolton Close | $480,000 – $520,000 | 0249 260 600

Bonnells Bay10.30am – 11.30am | 1b Amos Street | $475k to $520K | 4944 5600

Boolaroo9.00am – 10.00am | 42 Main Road | $449,000 – $465,000 | 4943 6333

9.00am – 10.00am | 42 Main Road | $349,000 – $355,000 | 4943 6333

9.00am – 10.00am | 42 Main Road | $420,000 – $435,000 | 4943 6333

10.00am – 10.30am | 2 Fourth Street | Guide $540,000 | 4944 5600

11.30am – 12.00pm | 24 Fifth Street | $370,000 to $410,000 | 4950 6111

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 42 Main Road | $449,000 – $465,000 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 42 Main Road | $420,000 – $435,000 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 42 Main Road | $349,000 – $355,000 | 4943 6333

Booragul10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Rens Street | Auction | 4959 1677

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 5 Rens Street | Auction | 4959 1677

Broadmeadow11.00am – 1.00pm | Display 128 Beaumont St | Contact Agent | 0417 030 301

Buttaba11.00am – 11.30am | 2 Newark Street | $559,000 | 4975 4800

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 15 Fred Avery Drive | $795,000 | 4959 1677

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 25 Haslemere Crescent | $579,000 | 4975 1644

Cameron Park10.00am – 10.30am | 27 Floresta Crescent | $495,000 – $530,000 | 4989 4008

10.00am – 10.30am | 1 Lucia Crescent | $490,000 – $525,000 | 4989 4008

10.00am – 10.30am | 2/51 Flamingo Drive | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

11.30am – 12.00pm | 172 Northlakes Drive | $610,000 to $660,000 | 4950 6111

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 6 Graysynd Circuit | $550,000 – $600,000 | 4950 8555

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 27 Craighill Crescent | $500,000 – $550,000 | 4950 8555

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 8 Hoya Close | $510,000 – $550,000 | 0410 447 054

Cardiff10.00am – 10.30am | 28 Illawarra Avenue | $540,000 – $570,000 | 4908 5900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 2/5 Blaxland Road | $549,000-$599,000 | 4960 0499

Cardiff Heights10.00am – 10.30am | 19 Rowes Lane | $650,000 – $680,000 | 4952 6500

Carrington11.00am – 11.30am | 133 Hill Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 89 Doran Street | Auction 13/5 12:45pm | 0402 411 317

Charlestown10.00am – 10.30am | 4/24 Madeleine Avenue | $440,000 – $460,000 | 4904 8400

10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Chester Close | $795,000 – $870,000 | 0413 437654

10.00am – 10.30am | 6/21 Edward Street | Guide $450,000 – $46 | 4908 5900

10.15am – 10.45am | 16 Algona Road | Guide: $640,000 | 4904 8400

11.00am – 11.30am | 7 Hallam Street | Guide: $640,000 | 4904 8400

11.45am – 12.15pm | 150 Tirriki Street | Auction | 4904 8400

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 69 James Street | $600,000 – $650,000 | 4904 8400

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 16 Bradman Close | $635,000 | 4943 6333

Coal Point10.00am – 10.30am | 110 Coal Point Road | $590,000 | 4959 1677

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 267A Coal Point Rd | $1850000 – $1950000 | 4959 8667

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 8 Rofe Street | AUCTION 20.05.17 | 4975 1644

12.45pm – 1.15pm | 19 Rofe Street | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4959 1466

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 27 Whitelocke Street | $650,000 | 4959 1677

3.00pm – 3.45pm | 355 Coal Point Road | $975,000 | 4959 1677

Cooks Hill10.00am – 10.30am | 86 Bull Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.30am – 11.00am | 74 Bull Street | Guide $825,000 | 0418 682 377

10.30am – 11.00am | 15 Young Street | Auction 27/5 10:30am | 0402 411 317

10.30am – 11.00am | 110 Bull Street | Auction Sat 13th May | 4902 7222

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 72 Bruce Street | Auction | 4915 3000

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 10/75 Union Street | $450,000 – $475,000 | 0417 030 301

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 50 Parkway Avenue | Auction | 4959 1677

Croudace Bay2.00pm – 2.30pm | 31 Corymbia Street | $695,000 | 4908 5900

Dora Creek10.00am – 10.30am | 32 Dora Street | $579,000 – $629,000 | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 76 Kalang Rd | AUCTION | 4959 8667

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 270A Dora Street | AUCTION | 0410 545 947

Dudley11.00am – 11.30am | 10 Frederick Street | Auction 27/5/17 | 0419 605801

Edgeworth1.00pm – 1.30pm | 3 Kinross Avenue | $450,000 – $495,000 | 4950 8555

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 13 Carinda Avenue | $500,000 – $550,000 | 4950 8555

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 17 Oakville Road | $395,000 – $430,000 | 4950 8555

Eleebana9.00am – 9.30am | 1 Rothbury Street | $779,500 | 4943 6333

11.00am – 11.30am | 22 Haynes Avenue | Guide $600,000 | 4944 5600

11.00am – 11.30am | 47 Jonathon Street | Price On Request | 4944 5600

11.30am – 12.00pm | 7 Moani Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 16 Dalwood Close | Guide $1.05M to $1.1 | 4944 5600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 100 Glad Gunson Drive | $690,000 – $740,000 | 4903 8228

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 8 Wyndham Way | Guide $825,000 | 4944 5600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 3 Boatmans Row | $1,185,000 – $1,300, | 4902 7222

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 63 Croft Road | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4915 3800

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 1 Rothbury Street | $779,500 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 41 Ian Street | Guide $780K to $85K | 4944 5600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 4 Clare Close | $840,000-$870,000 | 4915 7888

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 16, Charlton Street | $1,750,000 | 4908 5900

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 10 Ian Street | $599,000 | 4915 3800

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 42 Haynes Avenue | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4915 3800

Elermore Vale11.00am – 11.30am | 41 Virgo Street | $430,000 – $470,000 | 4957 6166

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 28 Pisces Avenue | $720,000-$780,000 | 0414 253 545

Fennell Bay10.00am – 10.30am | 31/305 Main Road | $345,000 | 4975 4800

Fern Bay11.30am – 12.00pm | 21 Diuris Street | $650,000 – $715,000 | 4989 4018

Fishing Point11.00am – 11.30am | 134 Fishing Point Road | $750,000 – $795,000 | 4959 8667

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 75 Sealand Road | $595,000 | 4959 1677

2.15pm – 2.45pm | 132a Fishing Point Road | $749,000 | 4959 1466

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 6 Balmoral Place | $695,000 – $725,000 | 4959 1466

Fletcher11.00am – 11.30am | 4 Oak Close | $635,000 | 0418447856

11.00am – 11.30am | 17 Ebony Close | $620,000-$660,000 | 0412 290 452

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 9 Brookfield Avenue | $580,000-$600,000 | 0409 099 991

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 1/33 Churnwood Drive | $495,000 – $530,000 | 4989 4021

Floraville11.15am – 11.45am | 66 Marlin Avenue | Auction | 4904 8400

11.45am – 12.15pm | 1 Regency Place | $699,000-$730,000 | 0410 312 281

Fullerton Cove11.00am – 4.00pm | The Cove Village | Contact Agent | 4908 5900

Garden Suburb10.15am – 11.00am | 34 Rose Close | $485,000 – $525,000 | 4957 6166

11.30am – 12.00pm | 58 Robinia Grove | $775,000 | 0418 684 866

12.00pm – 12.45pm | 18 Irvine Street | $800,000 – $825,000 | 4952 6500

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 122 Prospect Road | Auction 27/05/17 | 4961 5181

Georgetown11.00am – 11.30am | 50 Chatham Road | Auction | 4908 5900

Hamilton10.00am – 10.30am | 35 Cameron Street | Auction | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 7/113 Cleary Street | $795,000 | 0423 375 591

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 43 Everton Street | Auction | 4943 6333

12.10pm – 12.40pm | 21 Cleary Street | $650,000 – $700,000 | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 2.00pm | 22 Cleary Street | $1.05M-$1.1M | 0409 562 633

Hamilton North10.00am – 10.45am | 44 Boreas Road | AUCTION | 0412 496 610

2.15pm – 2.45pm | 12 Phillips Street | Auction | 4904 8400

Hamilton South1.00pm – 1.30pm | 94A Kemp Street | $1,080,000 – $1,120, | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 94 Kemp Street | $1,150,000 – $1,220, | 4902 7222

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 2/20 Churchill Circuit | Preview | 4915 7888

Heddon Greta4.00pm – 4.30pm | 6 Errol Close | $420,000-$460,000 | 4915 7888

Hillsborough10.00am – 10.30am | 105 Hillsborough Road | Auction | 4950 8555

Islington10.30am – 11.00am | 4 Hubbard Street | Auction 27/05/17 | 4961 5181

11.00am – 11.45am | 6 Redman Street | $500,000-$550,000 | 4960 0499

Jesmond10.30am – 11.00am | 17 Heaton Street | $429,000 | 0411 843 051

10.30am – 11.00am | 7/50 Robert Street | $325,000 | 4950 2025

11.15am – 11.45am | 10/6-8 Goodwin Street | $382,000 | 4950 2025

11.30am – 12.00pm | 28 Steel Street | $565,000 | 0413 209 505

Jewells10.00am – 10.30am | 22 Ntaba Road | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

Kahibah9.30am – 10.00am | 73 Burwood Street | Contact Agent | 4904 8400

10.45am – 11.15am | 61 Burwood Street | $645,000 | 4943 6333

Kilaben Bay10.30am – 11.00am | 27 Barina Avenue | $750,000 | 4959 1677

11.00am – 11.30am | 15 Lakeview Road | $695,000 | 4959 1677

Kotara11.00am – 11.30am | 9 Lynette Place | Price on Request | 4902 7222

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 13 Moruya Parade | $550,000 – $590,000 | 0249 260 600

Kotara South10.00am – 10.30am | 30 Elvidge Crescent | $599,950 | 4943 6333

Lambton10.00am – 10.30am | 8 Croudace Street | $465,000 – $510,000 | 0410 468 968

11.00am – 11.30am | 96 Howe Street | AUCTION | 0407 826 391

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 11, Jerrawa Close | $730,000 – $770,000 | 4908 5900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 12 Kerrai Close | Guide $700,000 | 0249 260 600

Macquarie Hills10.00am – 10.30am | 1/5 Blaxland Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.30am – 11.00am | 4 Ripon Way | Preview | 0410 312 281

11.15am – 11.45am | 56 Delaware Drive | $670,000 to $695,000 | 4928 7400

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 50 Delaware Drive | $730,000-$790,000 | 4954 7447

Marks Point11.00am – 11.30am | 153 Marks Point Road | $995K to $1.055M | 4944 5600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 7 Village Bay Close | $965K to $995K | 4944 5600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 44 Emily Street | $500,000 – $550,000 | 4908 5900

Maryland11.00am – 11.30am | 36 Seaton Street | $495,000-$535,000 | 0427 491 273

11.15am – 11.45am | 62 Alkoo Crescent | $500,000 to $540,000 | 4955 6900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 18 Karneen Avenue | $650,000 – $700,000 | 4904 8400

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 15 Seaton Street | $510,000 – $560,000 | 0249 260 600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 43 Berrico Avenue | $520,000 – $555,000 | 4989 4021

Maryville12.00pm – 12.30pm | 47 Lewis Street | Auction | 0408 525 362

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 75 Northumberland Street | Price on Request | 4989 4013

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 25 McMichael Street | Auction 3/6/17 | 0410 468 968

Mayfield10.00am – 10.30am | 92 Kerr Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

11.00am – 11.30am | 35 Kerr Street | Auction | 4950 8555

11.15am – 12.00pm | 4 Texas Street | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

11.30am – 12.00pm | 10 Cadell Avenue | $490,000-$530,000 | 0425 278 850

12.00pm – 12.45pm | 32 Upfold Street | $500,000-$550,000 | 4960 0499

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 5/16 Myola Street | $395,000 – $415,000 | 0407 826 391

1.00pm – 1.45pm | 44 Ingall Street | AUCTION | 4960 0499

Mayfield East12.00pm – 12.30pm | 4 Crebert Street | $650,000 | 4908 5900

Merewether10.00am – 10.30am | 4/52 Wilton Street | Guide $470,000 | 0411 573 538

10.30am – 11.30am | 56 Frederick Street | $1.78m – $1.9m | 0411745788

11.00am – 11.30am | 160 Glebe Road | Auction | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 200 Scenic Drive | Price on Request | 4989 4003

11.50am – 12.20pm | 40a Rowan Crescent | Auction | 4902 7222

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 67 Wilton Street | Auction | 4902 7222

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 13 Macquarie Street | Auction 3/6 10.30am | 0418 682 377

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 11 Janet Street | Price on Request | 4989 4003

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 21 Curry Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 3/20 Winsor Street | $750,000 | 4989 4003

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 2/36 John Parade | $490,000 | 4989 4013

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 52 Myamblah Crescent | $890,000 | 4989 4003

Mirrabooka12.00pm – 1.00pm | 67 Hillcrest Road | $735,000 | 4944 5600

Mount Hutton1.00pm – 1.30pm | 51 Auklet Road | $229,950 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 189 Old Warners Bay Road | $1.775M to $1.9M | 4944 5600

Murrays Beach2.30pm – 3.00pm | 27 Lake Forest Drive | By Neg $725,000 $765 | 4945 8600

Nelson Bay10.00am – 10.30am | 3/15 Victoria Parade | Guide $475,000 | 4944 5600

Newcastle9.30am – 10.00am | 4/22 Brown Street | $399,000 | 0402 009 532

10.00am – 10.30am | 506/335 Wharf Road | $620,000 – $670,000 | 0417 030 301

10.00am – 10.30am | 609/12 Bellevue Street | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

10.00am – 10.30am | 9/522 Hunter Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.30am – 11.00am | 33/304 Wharf Road | $1,800,000- $1,900,0 | 4902 7222

10.30am – 11.00am | 1/5 Tudor Street | $440,000 – $480,000 | 4989 4013

11.15am – 11.45am | Lvl 6, 6/610 Worth Place | $730,000 | 4902 7222

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 901/6 Watt Street | Auction 27/5/17 | 0410 468 968

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 505/2 Honeysuckle Drive | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 401/5 Honeysuckle Drive | Auction | 4904 8400

2.15pm – 2.45pm | 1/570 Hunter Street | $380,000 – $410,000 | 0417 030 301

3.15pm – 3.45pm | 305/111 Scott Street | $420,000 – $450,000 | 0417 030 301

Newcastle East10.00am – 10.30am | 308/26 Pacific Street | $475,000 – $485,000 | 0407 826 391

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 9 Beach Street | $1.29m-$1.35m | 0412 680 584

Newcastle West10.15am – 10.45am | 401/12 Bellevue Street | $640,000 – $680,000 | 4957 6166

New Lambton9.00am – 9.30am | 1-5/9 Regent Street | $789,000 – $798,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 8 Mahogany Drive | Price On Request | 4902 7222

11.30am – 12.00pm | 3 Hitchcock Avenue | $680,000 | 4989 4013

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 178 Bridges Road | $499,000 | 0411 843 051

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 31 Jellicoe Parade | $690,000 – $759,000 | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 25 Errington Avenue | $700,000 – $750,000 | 4957 6166

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 49 Carrington Parade | Contact Agent | 0412 680 584

New Lambton Heights11.00am – 11.30am | 56 Holly Circuit | $550,000 – $570,000 | 4952 6500

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 7 Grandview Road | $580,000-$630,000 | 4954 7447

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 8 Ridegway Road | $1,325,000 – $1,400, | 4957 6166

North Lambton12.00pm – 12.30pm | 11 Kindra Place | $470,000 | 0418447856

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 13 Notley Street | $449,950 | 4908 5900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 14 Third Avenue | $730,000 – $780,000 | 0413 209 505

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 308 Newcastle Road | $380,000-$410,000 | 4960 0499

Pelican12.00pm – 12.30pm | 30 Karog Street | $645,000-$695,000 | 4915 7888

Rankin Park1.00pm – 1.30pm | 288 Grandview Road | Preview | 4908 5900

Rathmines11.00am – 11.45am | 12 The Circlet | Auction Today | 4959 1677

Raymond Terrace10.00am – 10.30am | 110 Dalyell Way | 489000 | 4928 4000

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 20 Anne Street | $269,000 – $295,000 | 4903 8228

Redhead10.00am – 10.30am | 85 Cowlishaw Street | Guide: $840,000 | 4904 8400

Rutherford10.30am – 11.00am | 17 Grand Parade | $490,000 – $530,000 | 4915 3800

Shortland9.30am – 10.30am | 22 Akuna Avenue | $430,000 – $470,000 | 4989 4013

10.00am – 10.30am | 190 Marsden Street | $550,000-$590,000 | 0412 290 452

11.00am – 11.30am | 25 Mawson Street | $455,000-$495,000 | 4954 7447

Speers Point12.30pm – 1.00pm | 60 Lakeview Street | $660,000 – $710,000 | 4908 5900

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 32 Hibiscus Close | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

3.00pm – 3.45pm | 17A Berkeley Street | Auction | 0418447856

Stockton10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Monmouth Street | Auction | 4955 6900

11.00am – 11.30am | 276 Fullerton Street | Preview | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 154 Douglas Street | Auction | 4955 6900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 221 Mitchell Street | 1.7m | 4928 7400

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 31 Newcastle Street | Auction | 4955 6900

Tanilba Bay3.00pm – 3.30pm | 48 Caswell Crescent | $700,000 to $770,000 | 4955 6900

The Hill10.00am – 10.30am | 3 Barker Street | $1,500,000 | 4989 4018

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 96 Wolfe Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 4/36 Kitchener Parade | Guide: $375,000 | 4904 8400

The Junction10.30am – 11.00am | 5/17 Kemp Street | $480,000 – $520,000 | 0249 260 600

Thornton12.30pm – 1.00pm | 20 Welwin Close | $465,000 to $500,000 | 4955 6900

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 17 Ridgemont Street | $580,000 – $630,000 | 0408 525 362

Tighes Hill10.00am – 10.30am | 40 Mitchell Street | $700,000 to $750,000 | 4928 7400

10.50am – 11.20am | 60 Elizabeth Street | Auction | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 14 Union Street | Guide on Request | 4929 5999

Tingira Heights1.30pm – 2.00pm | 33 Walumbi Avenue | Price guide $490,000 | 4908 5900

Toronto10.30am – 11.00am | 2&4 Warhurst Avenue | $440,000 – $460,000 | 4959 1466

11.00am – 11.30am | 6 Jarrett Street | AUCTION 01.06.17 | 4975 1644

11.30am – 12.00pm | 1 Cockatiel Street | $495,000 – $539,000 | 4959 1466

Valentine10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Japonica Place | Price on Request | 4989 4003

10.00am – 10.30am | 19 Mountbatten Place | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4942 8377

10.45am – 11.15am | 5/58 Allambee Place | $390,000 – $420,000 | 4915 3800

11.00am – 11.30am | 56 Berringar Road | $760,000 – $790,000 | 4942 8377

11.00am – 11.30am | 94 Dilkera Avenue | Preview | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 6/25-27 Lurnea Crescent | $459,000 | 4915 3800

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 49 Dilkera Avenue | By Neg $2,350,000 – | 4945 8600

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 1/3 Ruston Avenue | $480K to $520K | 4944 5600

Wallsend10.00am – 10.30am | 7 Dorrigo Street | Guide: $470,000 | 4904 8400

10.00am – 10.00am | 15 Moresby Street | $599,000 – $629,000 | 0400 911 802

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 12 Invermore Close | $549,950 | 4961 5181

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 24 Cressington Way | $575,000 | 4950 2025

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 3 Bean Street | $620,000 to $680,000 | 4955 6900

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 79 Macquarie Street | $400,000 to $500,000 | 4928 7400

Wangi Wangi12.00pm – 12.30pm | 41 Dobell Drive | $1250000 – $1295000 | 4959 8667

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 320 Dobell Drive | $949,000 – $995,000 | 4975 4800

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 4 Crescent Road | $749,000 | 4975 1644

Warabrook1.30pm – 2.00pm | 14 Eurabbie Avenue | $750,000 | 4950 2025

Waratah10.00am – 10.30am | 25 Platt Street | Auction 13/05/17 | 4961 5181

11.30am – 12.15pm | 1, 2, 3/6 High Street | $550,000 – $600,000 | 4989 4011

12.30pm – 1.30pm | 51 Station Street Waratah | Auction 27/05/17 | 0425 290 322

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 10 Myall Road | Guide- $750,000 | 0249 260 600

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 6/50 Waroonga Road | $270,000-$285,000 | 4915 7888

Warners Bay10.00am – 1.00pm | 215/6 King Street | $699,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 4/74 Albert Street | $460,000 – $490,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 99 Myles Ave | – | 4929 5999

10.00am – 10.30am | 6/68 Albert Street | $479,000 | 4915 3800

10.00am – 10.30am | 2/4 Yortson Street | $395,000 – $429,000 | 4902 7222

10.00am – 1.00pm | 221/6 Kings Street | $379,000 | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 95 Bayview Street | $529,000 – $569,000 | 4908 5900

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 6 Peachwood Close | $625,000 – $685,000 | 4903 8228

12.45pm – 1.15pm | 22 Rayford Street | $795,000 – $850,000 | 4903 8228

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 56 Mills Street | Auction | 0418447856

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 2/68 Queen Street | Guide: $390,000 | 4904 8400

West Wallsend3.30pm – 4.00pm | 7 Hyndes Street | $385,000 – $420,000 | 4950 8555

Whitebridge11.00am – 11.30am | 5 Kopa Street | Auction 20/5/17 | 0413 437654

11.00am – 11.30am | 6 Bulls Garden Road | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

11.00am – 11.30am | 142-146 Dudley Road | From $400,000 | 4904 8400

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 44 Justine Avenue | $645,000 – $675,000 | 4943 6333

Wickham10.45am – 11.15am | 106a The Lane | Auction 13/5 11:15am | 0412 680 584

Windale3.30pm – 4.00pm | 12 Wakool Street | $345,000 – $375,000 | 4950 8555

Woodrising1.30pm – 2.00pm | 4 Azzura Close | $455,000 – $485,000 | 4959 8667

Yarrawonga Park11.30am – 12.00pm | 23, Yoorala Road | Preview | 4908 5900

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Categories: 苏州美甲学校

Throat Scope founder Jennifer Holland shines on the US stage as her medical device company seeks to strengthen its market presence there ( admin posted on September 27th, 2019 )

Ambition: Throat Scope founder Jennifer Holland in Newcastle. Picture: Marina Neil

苏州美甲学校

You are the first Australian female to win a silver gong at the US-based Edison awards – honouring excellence in product development – for Throat Scope. What does the win mean to you?

It was an honour to win an Edison Award in New York. The award attracts some of the biggest companies in the world, like 3M and Phillips. To be recognised at this level was an amazing achievement for us.

You invented Throat Scope in 2009 after taking your child to the doctor’s and he was in pain during a mouth examination. How has the potential for the use of your product grown since then?

I designed Throat Scope to replace the penlight and wooden tongue depressor. Doctors, dentists, paediatricians, speech pathologists and paramedics now use Throat Scope. Throat Scope makes it possible to check for sore throats, sore teeth, and mouth ulcers at home. We also want to shine light on the importance of monthly self Oral Health Checks. We’re on a mission to educate the world on the early signs of Oral Cancer. Self-examination will save lives.

Your first brush with success was going on Channel 10’s Shark Tank program and landing a financial backer in tech start up multimillionaire Steve Baxter. Is he still invested in your company?

Steve has played a large part in the Throat Scope journey. His advice is invaluable. He is still an investor in Throat Scope.

Since your appearance on Shark Tank, what have been the biggest coups for your company?

In 17 months, we’ve secured 12 distributors across 146 countries. Team Medical Supplies is one of our largest deals to date, marketing and distributing Throat Scope in Australia. We’ve set up a new warehouse in Ohio in the USA, so we can ship direct to the US. We have three new US distributors and that number is growing.

How has the focus of your business changed since its inception and are there any new markets you envisage for Throat Scope?

Throat Scope provides medical professionals with an Easy, Fast and Accurate view of the mouth, throat, teeth, gums and soft tissue. Now we want to educate everyone about the benefits of at-home, monthly oral health self-checks. If a mole changes colour or shape we know to see a doctor. The early signs of oral cancer are also simple to detect but nobody knows what to look for. Throat Scope is partnering worldwide with Oral Cancer Foundations to educate everyone on the early signs.

What does an average day entail for you?

Most nights I have one or two calls to the US. I start my morning about 4:30am to get some work in before the children wake and also to coincide with US hours. I jump on the treadmill to run for 20 minutes and read emails. When the children wake, I’m in mum mode, getting breakfast, making lunches, dressing them, last minute homework, bags packed and then school drop off for three of my four children. With my fourth child in tow I head into the office for the day and leave about 2:55pm to do school pick up. I’m with the children in the afternoon, taxiing everyone to after school sports and dance. Then its homework, dinner, bath, books, bed and back to work for another couple of hours. My life is crazy but somehow it works. I love Sunday; I switch off and spend quality time with my family.

What are your current business goals?

The goal for Throat Scope and Holland Healthcare is to invent and develop revolutionary medical devices for the healthcare and home market. In 5 years our business will be on par with some of the leading global medical device companies.

What other medical devices are you working on?

We’ll soon be launching the Throat Scope App for parents and healthcare professionals. We’re also working on two new medical devices due out in 2018.

What drives you?

My motivation and drive come from my children. I want them to understand the importance of hard work, persistence and above all I want them to believe in themselves and have the confidence and courage to follow their dreams.

What is the biggest challenge to your business?

Challenges are part of growing, building and learning in business. A challenge for us now is the US company set up; finding the right staff, setting up the warehouse and office to run efficiently, and the intercompany transactions between home and the US.

What is the best part?

Definitely donating Throat Scope to doctors overseas who complete aid work in third world countries. I hope to one day go over and experience this first hand.

You have four young children and a hubby who is away a lot for work. What are your survival tools?

Becoming a mother during my start-up journey gave me all the skills, patience and perseverance I needed to succeed as an entrepreneur. Let’s face it; negotiating with a sick toddler at 3:00am is tough. If you survive that you can do anything.

Jennifer Holland

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Categories: 苏州美甲学校

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