Aussie rules makes play for new inner-city club

GROWING: Newcastle City and Terrigal-Avoca battle it out in the Black Diamond grand final last year. Picture: Simone De PeakAFL officials have started planning for a new inner-city Australian rules club to cater for growing demand in Newcastle.
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The NSW/ACT AFL hosted a meeting in Newcastle on Monday to set up a working party which will examine where the team will play, what it will be called and other details.

NSW/ACT AFL Northern NSW regional manager Simon Smythsaid Black Diamond Cup powerhouse Newcastle City had enjoyed a 37 per cent rise in junior player numbers and a 38 per cent increase in seniors from 2013 to 2016. The Blues and the Wallsend Swans, who have several junior teams, are the only Australian rules clubs in the Newcastle local government area.

“The rationale is the growth that we’ve seen within junior, senior and especially women’s AFL across the Hunter Valley, but more specifically Newcastle, and given the projected population growth that we will be seeing in the next 10 or 15 years,” Smyth said.

“We’re just trying to get ahead of the eight-ball and create opportunities for our game to continue to grow in Newcastle, and we think the best way to do that is to have another junior, senior, women’s club in the area.”

Newcastle City president Daniel Gardner, whose club has more than 150 registered seniors across three men’s and two women’s teams, said the Blues supported the idea of a second inner-city team as it would give more players opportunities to play at a highlevel.

The Blues have established themselves as the city’sdominant club on and off the field with drawcard facilities at No.1 Sportsground, although a controversial ban on recruiting players has brought them back to the pack this season.

But Smyth said the push for a new club was not aimed at spreading talent more evenly in the competition.

“That’s certainly not the driving factor. The driving factor is we need to cater for participants. There’s only so many teams we can fit on No.1 Sportsground at the moment,” he said.

“We’ve got the Newcastle City junior club booming and having their surplus teams playing elsewhere just to cater for the demand.

“Even though equalising talent may be a by-product, certainly that’s not the driving factor. We know our game’s growing, and the population of Newcastle will continue to grow,and not all of these players will be able to find a home at Newcastle City in the next five or ten years.”

West Newcastle played out of Wickham’s Hawkins Oval in the Newcastle AFL before merging with Wallsend when the Black Diamond AFL competition began in 2000.

Smyth said representatives from the former club were excited that “their patch of turf could be playing footy again”, although it was too early to say where a new club would play.

“We can’t come in and take over the ground of another sport, even though Hawkins Oval was a ground we used to play at,” he said. “We’ll be in constant communication with the council around opportunities to play at any facility we believe is appropriate in the inner west of Newcastle.

“Obviously Hawkins Oval makes sense from a traditional point of view, but we’re not in a position to go and knock out the current tenants.We understand that we may have to work with council and co-share with another code.”

Smyth said a club name was also open for debate.

“That’ll be up to the working party to decide, and it will come down to whether we’re relocating a club or starting up a new club or rehashing an old club, but certainly we think that having Newcastle in the name is an important thing so that people can play for this club and represent a part of Newcastle.”

The NSW/ACT AFL hopes the new club will have junior and women’s teams playing by next year.

“We want to aim high. That will be the charter of the working party to make those things happen,” Smyth said.

“There is a demand around women’s football at the moment.We know that we could probably start a women’s team tomorrow if we wanted to. And certainly there’s plenty of demand for junior footy and Auskick.

“At a minimum, if we can get a women’s team, some junior teams and some Auskick next year, that’s what we’ll be aiming for.

“If we’re able to get a senior men’s team as well, that’s an added bonus and we’d be very happy with that.”

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Budget fails to relieve the burden of many

The Turnbull Government’s tagline in Tuesday night’s budget touted fairness, opportunity and security for all Australians, but the reality of this statement is of grave concern for vulnerable people and those organisations that support them.
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The 2017 budget has resulted in apprehension for what the government intends to do to stop the increase of poverty in Australia, specifically with no commitment to increasing support payments, family tax benefits and expanding the cashless welfare trial and demerit scheme.

This year’s budget has frozen welfare payments at dangerously low levels, ignoring calls from services providers and the welfare sector to consider increases as a matter of priority.

Unfortunately, a lack of increased investment in support payments always has the biggest impact on those who need the most support to break the poverty cycle- children, young people, families and people with a disability. Poverty is not just about money or starvation. It’s about access to appropriate healthcare, affordable and appropriate housing, education and inclusion in society. Many of these issues were not adequately addressed in the budget and payments remain so low that poverty is a real scenario for many.

It’s particularly disappointing to see yet another attempt to reduce family tax benefits which will affect so many Australians who depend on such support. Families are already experiencing financial stress through the ever-increasing costs of living and it is simply unjust for families to assume the burden of balancing the budget for political gain.

While commitment to childcare and schools funding is a good start for families, it falls short of addressing key issues that result in poverty. As an experienced provider of emergency relief services across regional NSW, Samaritans is acutely aware that pressures on families are increasing. Changes in welfare support not only result in a negative impact on vulnerable people, but on providers who quite suddenly experience increased demand for services and support.

This year’s Rental Affordability Snapshot released by Samaritans and Anglicare in April showed that in the past five years, there has been no relief for people seeking affordable rental. We welcomed the budget’s announcement of funding measures to making housing more affordable and address homelessness. The bond aggregator for community housing is great news for the welfare sector.

Samaritans Specialist Homelessness services listed family breakdown, domestic violence and housing affordability and availability stress as the top three reasons for people seeking support in the past 12 months.

The biggest win from the 2017 budget was the government’s move to secure the future of the NDIS through the Medicare Levy and there was also welcome news of investment in the mental health space. News of the government’s commitment to helping people with mental health-related disabilities under the NDIS is a huge win for vulnerable people.

After this budget, we’re looking to the Turnbull Government to truly deliver on their promises of a fair and secure Australia, with adequate opportunity for all.

At Samaritans, we’re encouraging all levels of Government to work together to end the poverty trap and create a safe and secure community for everyone.

Peter Gardiner is the chief executive of the Samaritans Foundation.

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When terrorism strikes, we must unite

TRIBUTES: Whether the attack occurred in Manchester, Sydney or Iraq, victims of terrorism and their families deserve empathy and compassion, not judgement.I HAVE seen that a 12-year-old Australian girl is among the victims of a terrorist attack in Baghdad while she was buying ice-cream with her family on holiday.
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We should be all responding to her loss with compassion, but instead I have witnessed many statements by members of our society filled with hatred and anger and posing questions such as ‘why was she even there?’, ‘why wasn’t she at school?’ and ‘what kind of family would take her there?’.

I am disgusted to see the hatred towards this innocent girl and her family who are going through their toughest time. We did not question why concert-goers at the tragedy in Manchester were there, so why are we responding with zero compassion for this young girl? In these horrific situations we should respond to the loss with compassion and empathy for families and friends of the victims, always.

The facts are clear. Terrorism can and will occur anywhere. It is no longer something that occurs far away, or only in third-world countries. It occurs right here at home, and everywhere else. However, we should not let terrorism define our way of life. We should not let terrorism define whether we attend events or not. We should not let terrorism define whether we participate in activities or not. We should not let terrorism define whether we leave the house today or not. We must not let terrorism divide our community, both local and global. We must unite.

My deepest condolences to the families and friends of the victims in recent attacks.

Bradley Burns,CardiffListen on light railTODAY we read that NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian has put the Fire Levy “on hold” until a further review is undertaken (‘Berejiklian delays fire levy’, Herald,31/5).

Gladys is quoted as saying: “We are a government that listens and we have heard the concerns of the community and will take the time to get this right.”

Sadly, this doesn’t seem to be the case with the plans for the light rail route here in Newcastle.Enough people have spoken out against the route of the light rail over the past couple of years and I would like to hear Gladys’ reason for not listening to her government’s Newcastle constituents in this case, as our voices seem to fall on deaf ears.

The cost of this “folly” to Novocastrians is just as important as the cost factor used as a reason for Gladys to act on the Fire Levy.

Come on Gladys, be the good Premier a lot of us believe you can be by using that “listening device” touted in the case of the Fire Levy for the case of Newcastle’s light rail route. Let’s not waste money raised from the lease of the Port of Newcastle. The savings to be made by taking the logical route for the light rail here in Newcastle can be used elsewhere, maybe in some other regional centre which is missing out, or even to offset the proposed Fire Levy.

Rod Faulkner,MarylandMore detail neededPERHAPS Supercars should head to Bunnings and purchase a moral compass.

Representative Cole Hitchcock appears to be telling residents they should make a decision for themselves about whether to stay or go during the event (‘Demand for noise plan’Herald,30/5). How can anyone decide without the relevant information? What if, like many, you don’t have the option to leave? Basically I think it boils down to Supercars trying to force people out. That way Supercars wouldn’t have to compromise or compensate for making 200 homes and hundreds of apartments unlivable.

Destination NSW and Newcastle City Council simply defer to Supercars when questioned over responsibility for noise. And all the while Supercars maintain the right to stay silent.

Mark Sampson, NewcastleDangers of drug misuseKERRY Redman (Letters, 31/5) rightly points out the dangers of marijuana.

The drug that causes society the most death, and damage, is alcohol, which sadly is legal and widely advertised.

All drugs, legal and illegal, are dangerous when misused. The problem with illegal drugs is that the user has no idea what they are consuming. Imagine if alcoholic drinks had no content on the label. We would have overdoses even more often that we do now.

It is no wonder there are deaths from illegal drugs. Sadly, we also have tens of thousands of deaths from the misuse of prescription drugs, tobacco, and alcohol: all currently legal.

Joan Lambert, AdamstownConcerning conditionsI HAVE read the terms and conditions of entry into the Supercars compound which will be applied to residents who decide to accept ‘free’ residents access tickets.In order to access our homes, we will be required to sign the terms, set out by Supercars and, presumably approved by Destination NSW. There are many parts of the terms which cause us extreme concern. I will list just a few of the more obvious ones.

Paragraph 5 states: “Warning – motor sport activities, the event and activities associated with the event are inherently dangerous and accidents can happen. There is significant risk of an accident causing injury, disability, death or property damage or economic loss.”

Is this not an explicit admission from Supercars that this is an inappropriate event to be held in an inner city suburb where homes are within two to three metres of the track?

In signing on for the pass, we will also be required, in paragraph 6 to agree that: “Upon entering the event, each patron provides this release…: SCA and the associated entities are not liable to me or to any person with me for (regardless of how or when the liability is caused, or by whom it is caused….): a. my death, injury to me or the injury or death of anybody else with me; b. damage to, destruction of, theft of or unauthorised delivery up of any of my property or equipment…; c. or damage to, destruction of, theft of or delivery up of any of my clothing or other personal items.”

So Supercars are requiring us to absolve them of damage to our person, our death, injury (including hearing loss, presumably), regardless if it is the race itself, persons associated with the race or other visitors who cause such damage. Our question is: where are the protections to our property?

The critical question is: what will Supercars do if we refuse to sign? We are allowing this organisation into our suburb to conduct an event which by their own admission carries extraordinary risk.We have put this to Supercars, as usual, without response.

Kate Napthali, Newcastle East

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Will he or won’t he: the Sutherland dilemma ?

The AFL has made its first approach to teen dual-sports sensation Will Sutherland, holding talks with the schoolboy who recruiters believe could be taken as high as the top 10 in this year’s national draft.
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And in the latest intriguing turn, Sutherland, who is the captain of the under-19 Australian cricket team, was due to meet with Cricket Victoria officials this week but cancelled due to school commitments.

It comes after Sutherland and his mother Heidi were approached by the AFL, with league representatives providing information regarding programs and pathways into the professional football.

The AFL development team reiterated to Sutherland that a place in the upcoming under-18 championships would not be put in jeopardy should he choose, as expected, not to play TAC Cup football. Either way, the league remains hopeful that the VCE student will represent Vic Metro in championships next month.

Not only is Sutherland’s father, James, the most senior cricket official in the country, but his mother is now a director on the board of AFL Victoria.

AFL Football operations boss Simon Lethlean and general counsel Andrew Dillon are also directors with AFL Victoria.

Despite having to reschedule the meeting to talk to Sutherland, Cricket Victoria remain committed to convincing him to stick with the bat and ball.

“We certainly believe he is a player who could play for Victoria for many years, and very possibly higher,” Victorian chairman of selectors Andrew Lynch told Fairfax Media.

“We want him and it sounds like footy wants him.”

Sutherland, a student at the prestigious private boys’ school Scotch College, is not only gifted at football and cricket, he is also highly academic, similar to his father and grandfather Ivan.

The AFL was clear to Sutherland that there is no pressure on him to make a decision soon, and it respected the fact he was keen to concentrate on his studies.

Sutherland was again listed in Scotch College’s best players after being tagged in their win over Geelong College on Saturday, a week after being best afield in their loss to Xavier College.

With Sutherland to decide in the coming months which sport he wants to pursue professionally, the situation can be likened to that of Pat McKenna in 2014.

Two months after leading the Australian under-19 cricket side to victory over Sri Lanka – as Sutherland has just achieved – McKenna nominated for the draft and was taken by Greater Western Sydney.

After failing to play a senior game in his two seasons in Sydney, he was traded to Melbourne in last year’s trade period and signed a two-year contract.

Sutherland is a key position size in football and can play in the midfield. Recruiters who have watched his two matches at school level have been impressed not only with his size and pace, but his extremely competitive nature. In cricket, he is a middle-order batsman who bowls first-change.

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‘This can’t be what education is about’: Students, teachers react to Naplan changes

Schools are preparing for an “administrative mind-blowing exercise” as the final day of NAPLAN tests looms for the first cohort of year 9 students who require three band eights to qualify for their HSC.
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Fewer than half of all year 9 students are expected to achieve this NAPLAN result and most will need to pass online tests in the following years to receive their HSC, under the NSW government’s new minimum literacy and numeracy standard announced last year.

The principal at Cerdon College in Merrylands, Patricia Baker, said schools have been left out of the consultation process and have received very little information about the follow-up online tests.

“We have no idea when these tests are going to be offered, how they’re going to be offered,” Mrs Baker said. “There are a lot of unknowns. I think it’s an administrative mind-blowing exercise because schools are being asked to do the heavy lifting.

“Just arranging times and supervision is going to mean time out of the normal teaching for students.”

The NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) confirmed that “the majority of students will be sitting at least one of the online tests starting in Year 10” and they will be given two chances per year to take the tests, in a letter published online a week before NAPLAN tests began.

Sonya Agius, a maths teacher at the school, said teaching practices would likely change as the online tests become a concern for senior students.

“I’m hoping this will be a positive change, but this can’t be what education is about. It has to be beyond [NAPLAN],” Ms Agius said.

“We just have to take it a step at a time and look at what the processes are after the results come out, how are we going to deal with it as a school, as a system.”

Mrs Baker said the pressure on teachers and students will increase as the HSC approaches.

“At that point, how are schools going to be able to remediate that deficit?” she asked. “It will place a lot of pressure.

“The concern we would have is that students will lose their confidence and feel they’re defined by a less than perfect mark.”

Mrs Baker said “the jury is still out” on the value of the minimum standard after the tertiary admissions body confirmed students who do not achieve the requirements will still be able to get an ATAR and go to university.

“We’ve tried to acknowledge it’s a high stakes prequalification for the HSC but it’s not the end of the world,” Mrs Baker said.

“They may not get the HSC but it is my belief the universities will still accept them because by that stage their literacy skills as tested by the HSC are going to be at the level that says they’re very capable, articulate men and women.”

Charlize D’Souza, a year 9 student at Cerdon College, said linking NAPLAN to the HSC is “not really fair”.

“By the time you get to the HSC you actually care about these things,” she said. “Right now we just have to learn and prepare for the future, it’s not our time yet I think.”

Rose Hanratty, 14, said: “It’s more of an inconvenience that you have to redo [the tests], but I think it’ll be fine. We are a bit of the guinea pigs, but someone’s got to be the first year. We just drew the short straw.

“It was a bit of a shock, but then I just sort of adjusted to it and went, ‘This is how it’s going to go’.”

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Treasurer steps in as China’s spending spree on Australian housing soars

Blanchett’s mansion back on the market as Chinese buyer defaultsFederal Budget: Foreign buyers hit by vacancy tax, restrictionsChinese buying Australian real estate tops foreign investment
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China’s crackdown on capital outflows into overseas property markets doesn’t appear to be working judging by the surge in investment from its shores into Australian real estate.

Chinese buyers led a 19 per cent jump in residential applications to 40,149, according to the Foreign Investment Review Board annual report, equating to a peak of proposed investment worth $72.4 billion for the 2015-16 financial year.

The surge in interest from China’s swelling investor class isn’t lost on Treasurer Scott Morrison, with foreign buyers again being slugged with steeper charges on purchases and new fees on property left vacant for six months or more announced in Tuesday’s federal budget.

“If anything I would say the investment coming from China has increased, not decreased, since China’s crackdown was launched,” said joint principal of SydneySlice Buyers’ Agent, Steve Smith.

“My sources are suggesting that the government is actually amending the foreign capital restrictions, which could make it easier for foreign investors, and if that’s the case we will see local activity increasing, not decreasing.”

Craig Pontey, director of Ray White Double Bay in Sydney, said buyer interest from China wasn’t just increasing, but “substantially increasing” in both sales and buyer inquiry from China.

“The buyers who dominated sales three and four years ago are being joined by their friends and colleagues from China, and they are finding ways to filter their money out of China to do so,” said Mr Pontey.

A year ago China started forcing its state-owned banks to delay or block large sums of money going overseas, and has more recently moved to block money transfers through Macau.

The issue was brought home to Sydneysiders last August when the Hunters Hill trophy home of Cate Blanchett and her husband Andrew Upton was returned to the market after the $19.8 million buyer was forced to default on the sale given problems getting their funds out of China.

By law, individuals in China are restricted to moving the equivalent of $US50,000 ($68,000) out of the country each year.

McGrath’s Michael Coombs said the continued strength in buyer interest from China was typified by the current campaign underway to sell the Alex Popov-designed trophy home in Northbridge of hedge fund manager David Curtis and his wife Joan for $15 million. Of 142 enquiries, at least 40 per cent came from China, he said.

“Without the current curbs on foreign buyers in place we would have double the number of sales to overseas owners, because the demand for local real estate is just growing,” said Mr Coombs.

Simon Platt, who left Kinsale Property Group late last year to join Unique Estates, said: “There was a lot of media attention and talk about the capital controls impacting on our local market, but we haven’t seen any real impact or change in demand.”

Sydney’s trophy home market has proved largely immune to capital controls, although the market does see sporadic bursts of activity from China, according to Ken Jacobs, of Christie’s International.

“At the top end buyers have a reason for being here – whether that be for schooling or business – rather than just being straight investors, and they have their residency and other sources for funds, so at that end of the market we are not seeing any real change in demand,” Mr Jacobs said.

In May last year, Australian banks started clamping down on loans obtained based on overseas income.

However, ???Meriton Group’s owner Harry Triguboff told The Australian Financial Reviewthis week he has started financing about $200 million of the $1.4 billion worth of apartment sales he expects to make this year to help Chinese buyers struggling with the tougher currency controls.

CBRE director, residential projects Murray Wood, said concerns about the ability of foreign buyers to settle on their purchases prompted some of their developer clients to opt to sell only a small percentage of stock to non-residents, and others have chosen not to canvas offshore buyers at all.

One of the standout measures introduced in Tuesday’s federal budget will be an annual charge aimed at encouraging foreign buyers to rent out their vacant Australian real estate. Any purchase after May 9 will be slugged with an annual charge equal to their foreign investment application fee – starting at $5000 for property valued at $1 million or less – if they leave the property vacant.

The budget also introduces measures to deny foreign tax residents access to capital gains tax exemptions from Tuesday, and those already purchased will have those exemptions grandfathered until June 2019.

For the third year in a row China was the largest source of approved investment across all sectors, staking a claim to 72 per cent of all approvals.

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Kasiano could be squeezed out as Bulldogs overhaul roster

Sam Kasiano could be the first contracted Bulldog to leave Belmore as part of the club’s roster overhaul after Melbourne made a play for the hulking prop.
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The Storm is desperate to bolster its forward pack and have identified Kasiano as the man to help fill the void. The ladder leaders rarely attempt to recruit an established star but are making an exception as they brace for the departure of Blues hopeful Jordan McLean (Cowboys) and Kiwi international Tohu Harris (Warriors) just a year after losing Kevin Proctor to the Gold Coast.

Cooper Cronk’s decision to shift to Sydney also frees up salary cap space for the club to make a play for a big-name forward for the first time since luring Michael Crocker from the Roosters in 2006.

Kasiano is contracted to Canterbury until the end of 2018, but the club will need to shed stars, contracted or otherwise, to refresh its playing list. Coach Des Hasler is keen to retain the New Zealand and Samoan international but something has to give after the club confirmed the signing of Kieran Foran on Wednesday. Kasiano is one of several players on a back-ended deal, meaning his departure could be a win for the Bulldogs and the Storm.

A move south will also give Kasiano the opportunity to start games, a scenario which is no chance of happening when Woods arrives at the “family club” next year. The Bulldogs are unlikely to stand in Kasiano’s way if he is able to secure himself a long-term deal that sets up his future.

Josh Reynolds’ shift to Wests Tigers in 2018 will free up some salary cap space, while Will Hopoate and Michael Lichaa are yet to secure a home for next season. However, Canterbury is facing the prospect of bidding farewell to more players if the NRL doesn’t budge on its initial salary cap proposal to the Rugby League Players’ Association as part of the collective bargaining agreement negotiations.

Skipper James Graham, on a deal worth the best part of $1 million for 2018, has been identified as another player that could be squeezed out. Cashed-up Newcastle is watching the situation with interest after missing out on a number of potential recruits including Matt Scott, Dale Finucane, Matt Prior and Jack Bird. Halfback Moses Mbye has been shopped to rivals, while there has also been conjecture over the future of the Morris twins, Brett and Josh.

The Storm were one of Foran’s suitors, but the New Zealand international chose Canterbury to be closer to his two young children. The Storm have also missed out on Anthony Milford, who has recommitted to the Broncos.

Foran has a strong relationship with Hasler from their time together at Manly and came agonisingly close to rejoining his former mentor the last two times he was off contract.

“I know that family was a determining priority in Kieran’s decision,” Hasler said.

“He could have chosen to go to a handful of Sydney clubs, so we are pleased that he has chosen to continue his career at the Bulldogs.”

The Tigers and Cowboys are both keen on adding Tuimoala Lolohea to their roster immediately and are hopeful the Warriors will grant him an immediate release. The out-of-favour playmaker would slot in for the injured Johnathan Thurston if he shifts to Townsville, while a transfer to the Tigers would allow Mitchell Moses an early move to Parramatta.

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Open for inspection

Aberglasslyn9.45am – 10.15am | 18 Lapwing Street | $370,000-$400,000 | 0478 824 290
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10.30am – 11.00am | 21 Hibiscus Crescent | $400,000-$430,000 | 0478 824 290

Adamstown11.00am – 11.45am | 20 Olney Road | $585,000 – $615,000 | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 2/3 Fourth Street | $690,000-$740,000 | 0411 843 051

Adamstown Heights10.00am – 10.30am | 14 Randall Parade | Auction | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 22 Montrose Avenue | Auction 20/5/17 | 0410 468 968

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 160 Princeton Avenue | $1,250,000 – $1,375, | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 408, Brunker Road | Auction | 4908 5900

Arcadia Vale11.30am – 12.00pm | 19 Brooks Street | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4959 1466

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 35 Arcadia Street | $460,000 – $490,000 | 4975 1644

Awaba1.00pm – 1.30pm | 24 Wyong Street | AUCTION 27.05.17 | 4959 1466

Barnsley10.00am – 10.30am | 17 Codrington Street | $340,000-$370,000 | 0412 290 452

Belmont9.30am – 10.00am | E201 11 Ernest Street | By Neg $430,000 – $4 | 4945 8600

10.00am – 10.30am | E109 11 Ernest Street | By Neg $415,000 – $4 | 4945 8600

10.00am – 10.30am | 43 Livingstone Street | By Neg $400,000 – $4 | 4945 8600

11.00am – 11.30am | 12 Aylward Street | Auction | 4945 8600

11.00am – 11.30am | 24 Bellevue Road | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

11.00am – 11.30am | 24 George Street | Preview | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.30pm | 88 Ross Street | Auction | 4915 7888

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 19 Deane Street | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 49 Evans Street | $515,000-$540,000 | 0412 290 452

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 403/58 Brooks Parade | $1,100,000 | 4945 8600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 17A Aylward Street | $775,000 – $850,000 | 4903 8228

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 5 Lee Ann Crescent | $795,000 | 4915 7888

3.00pm – 3.30pm | 3 Lewers Street | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

Belmont North10.30am – 11.00am | 5 Kananook Cresent | $599,950 | 4943 6333

11.00am – 11.30am | 28 Leicester Avenue | $515,000 – $535,000 | 4908 5900

11.15am – 11.45am | 41 Camberwarra Drive | $780,000 | 4928 7400

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 69a John Street | $775,000 – $850,000 | 4904 8400

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 2/51 Mirambeena Street | Auction | 4945 8600

Belmont South1.00pm – 1.30pm | 4 McEwan Street | Preview | 4915 7888

Blackalls Park11.00am – 11.30am | 1 Adam Street | $565,000 – $615,000 | 4903 8228

Bolton Point10.00am – 10.30am | 16 Bolton Close | $480,000 – $520,000 | 0249 260 600

Bonnells Bay10.30am – 11.30am | 1b Amos Street | $475k to $520K | 4944 5600

Boolaroo9.00am – 10.00am | 42 Main Road | $449,000 – $465,000 | 4943 6333

9.00am – 10.00am | 42 Main Road | $349,000 – $355,000 | 4943 6333

9.00am – 10.00am | 42 Main Road | $420,000 – $435,000 | 4943 6333

10.00am – 10.30am | 2 Fourth Street | Guide $540,000 | 4944 5600

11.30am – 12.00pm | 24 Fifth Street | $370,000 to $410,000 | 4950 6111

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 42 Main Road | $449,000 – $465,000 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 42 Main Road | $420,000 – $435,000 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 42 Main Road | $349,000 – $355,000 | 4943 6333

Booragul10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Rens Street | Auction | 4959 1677

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 5 Rens Street | Auction | 4959 1677

Broadmeadow11.00am – 1.00pm | Display 128 Beaumont St | Contact Agent | 0417 030 301

Buttaba11.00am – 11.30am | 2 Newark Street | $559,000 | 4975 4800

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 15 Fred Avery Drive | $795,000 | 4959 1677

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 25 Haslemere Crescent | $579,000 | 4975 1644

Cameron Park10.00am – 10.30am | 27 Floresta Crescent | $495,000 – $530,000 | 4989 4008

10.00am – 10.30am | 1 Lucia Crescent | $490,000 – $525,000 | 4989 4008

10.00am – 10.30am | 2/51 Flamingo Drive | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

11.30am – 12.00pm | 172 Northlakes Drive | $610,000 to $660,000 | 4950 6111

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 6 Graysynd Circuit | $550,000 – $600,000 | 4950 8555

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 27 Craighill Crescent | $500,000 – $550,000 | 4950 8555

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 8 Hoya Close | $510,000 – $550,000 | 0410 447 054

Cardiff10.00am – 10.30am | 28 Illawarra Avenue | $540,000 – $570,000 | 4908 5900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 2/5 Blaxland Road | $549,000-$599,000 | 4960 0499

Cardiff Heights10.00am – 10.30am | 19 Rowes Lane | $650,000 – $680,000 | 4952 6500

Carrington11.00am – 11.30am | 133 Hill Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 89 Doran Street | Auction 13/5 12:45pm | 0402 411 317

Charlestown10.00am – 10.30am | 4/24 Madeleine Avenue | $440,000 – $460,000 | 4904 8400

10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Chester Close | $795,000 – $870,000 | 0413 437654

10.00am – 10.30am | 6/21 Edward Street | Guide $450,000 – $46 | 4908 5900

10.15am – 10.45am | 16 Algona Road | Guide: $640,000 | 4904 8400

11.00am – 11.30am | 7 Hallam Street | Guide: $640,000 | 4904 8400

11.45am – 12.15pm | 150 Tirriki Street | Auction | 4904 8400

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 69 James Street | $600,000 – $650,000 | 4904 8400

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 16 Bradman Close | $635,000 | 4943 6333

Coal Point10.00am – 10.30am | 110 Coal Point Road | $590,000 | 4959 1677

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 267A Coal Point Rd | $1850000 – $1950000 | 4959 8667

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 8 Rofe Street | AUCTION 20.05.17 | 4975 1644

12.45pm – 1.15pm | 19 Rofe Street | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4959 1466

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 27 Whitelocke Street | $650,000 | 4959 1677

3.00pm – 3.45pm | 355 Coal Point Road | $975,000 | 4959 1677

Cooks Hill10.00am – 10.30am | 86 Bull Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.30am – 11.00am | 74 Bull Street | Guide $825,000 | 0418 682 377

10.30am – 11.00am | 15 Young Street | Auction 27/5 10:30am | 0402 411 317

10.30am – 11.00am | 110 Bull Street | Auction Sat 13th May | 4902 7222

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 72 Bruce Street | Auction | 4915 3000

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 10/75 Union Street | $450,000 – $475,000 | 0417 030 301

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 50 Parkway Avenue | Auction | 4959 1677

Croudace Bay2.00pm – 2.30pm | 31 Corymbia Street | $695,000 | 4908 5900

Dora Creek10.00am – 10.30am | 32 Dora Street | $579,000 – $629,000 | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 76 Kalang Rd | AUCTION | 4959 8667

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 270A Dora Street | AUCTION | 0410 545 947

Dudley11.00am – 11.30am | 10 Frederick Street | Auction 27/5/17 | 0419 605801

Edgeworth1.00pm – 1.30pm | 3 Kinross Avenue | $450,000 – $495,000 | 4950 8555

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 13 Carinda Avenue | $500,000 – $550,000 | 4950 8555

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 17 Oakville Road | $395,000 – $430,000 | 4950 8555

Eleebana9.00am – 9.30am | 1 Rothbury Street | $779,500 | 4943 6333

11.00am – 11.30am | 22 Haynes Avenue | Guide $600,000 | 4944 5600

11.00am – 11.30am | 47 Jonathon Street | Price On Request | 4944 5600

11.30am – 12.00pm | 7 Moani Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 16 Dalwood Close | Guide $1.05M to $1.1 | 4944 5600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 100 Glad Gunson Drive | $690,000 – $740,000 | 4903 8228

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 8 Wyndham Way | Guide $825,000 | 4944 5600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 3 Boatmans Row | $1,185,000 – $1,300, | 4902 7222

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 63 Croft Road | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4915 3800

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 1 Rothbury Street | $779,500 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 41 Ian Street | Guide $780K to $85K | 4944 5600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 4 Clare Close | $840,000-$870,000 | 4915 7888

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 16, Charlton Street | $1,750,000 | 4908 5900

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 10 Ian Street | $599,000 | 4915 3800

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 42 Haynes Avenue | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4915 3800

Elermore Vale11.00am – 11.30am | 41 Virgo Street | $430,000 – $470,000 | 4957 6166

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 28 Pisces Avenue | $720,000-$780,000 | 0414 253 545

Fennell Bay10.00am – 10.30am | 31/305 Main Road | $345,000 | 4975 4800

Fern Bay11.30am – 12.00pm | 21 Diuris Street | $650,000 – $715,000 | 4989 4018

Fishing Point11.00am – 11.30am | 134 Fishing Point Road | $750,000 – $795,000 | 4959 8667

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 75 Sealand Road | $595,000 | 4959 1677

2.15pm – 2.45pm | 132a Fishing Point Road | $749,000 | 4959 1466

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 6 Balmoral Place | $695,000 – $725,000 | 4959 1466

Fletcher11.00am – 11.30am | 4 Oak Close | $635,000 | 0418447856

11.00am – 11.30am | 17 Ebony Close | $620,000-$660,000 | 0412 290 452

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 9 Brookfield Avenue | $580,000-$600,000 | 0409 099 991

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 1/33 Churnwood Drive | $495,000 – $530,000 | 4989 4021

Floraville11.15am – 11.45am | 66 Marlin Avenue | Auction | 4904 8400

11.45am – 12.15pm | 1 Regency Place | $699,000-$730,000 | 0410 312 281

Fullerton Cove11.00am – 4.00pm | The Cove Village | Contact Agent | 4908 5900

Garden Suburb10.15am – 11.00am | 34 Rose Close | $485,000 – $525,000 | 4957 6166

11.30am – 12.00pm | 58 Robinia Grove | $775,000 | 0418 684 866

12.00pm – 12.45pm | 18 Irvine Street | $800,000 – $825,000 | 4952 6500

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 122 Prospect Road | Auction 27/05/17 | 4961 5181

Georgetown11.00am – 11.30am | 50 Chatham Road | Auction | 4908 5900

Hamilton10.00am – 10.30am | 35 Cameron Street | Auction | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 7/113 Cleary Street | $795,000 | 0423 375 591

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 43 Everton Street | Auction | 4943 6333

12.10pm – 12.40pm | 21 Cleary Street | $650,000 – $700,000 | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 2.00pm | 22 Cleary Street | $1.05M-$1.1M | 0409 562 633

Hamilton North10.00am – 10.45am | 44 Boreas Road | AUCTION | 0412 496 610

2.15pm – 2.45pm | 12 Phillips Street | Auction | 4904 8400

Hamilton South1.00pm – 1.30pm | 94A Kemp Street | $1,080,000 – $1,120, | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 94 Kemp Street | $1,150,000 – $1,220, | 4902 7222

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 2/20 Churchill Circuit | Preview | 4915 7888

Heddon Greta4.00pm – 4.30pm | 6 Errol Close | $420,000-$460,000 | 4915 7888

Hillsborough10.00am – 10.30am | 105 Hillsborough Road | Auction | 4950 8555

Islington10.30am – 11.00am | 4 Hubbard Street | Auction 27/05/17 | 4961 5181

11.00am – 11.45am | 6 Redman Street | $500,000-$550,000 | 4960 0499

Jesmond10.30am – 11.00am | 17 Heaton Street | $429,000 | 0411 843 051

10.30am – 11.00am | 7/50 Robert Street | $325,000 | 4950 2025

11.15am – 11.45am | 10/6-8 Goodwin Street | $382,000 | 4950 2025

11.30am – 12.00pm | 28 Steel Street | $565,000 | 0413 209 505

Jewells10.00am – 10.30am | 22 Ntaba Road | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

Kahibah9.30am – 10.00am | 73 Burwood Street | Contact Agent | 4904 8400

10.45am – 11.15am | 61 Burwood Street | $645,000 | 4943 6333

Kilaben Bay10.30am – 11.00am | 27 Barina Avenue | $750,000 | 4959 1677

11.00am – 11.30am | 15 Lakeview Road | $695,000 | 4959 1677

Kotara11.00am – 11.30am | 9 Lynette Place | Price on Request | 4902 7222

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 13 Moruya Parade | $550,000 – $590,000 | 0249 260 600

Kotara South10.00am – 10.30am | 30 Elvidge Crescent | $599,950 | 4943 6333

Lambton10.00am – 10.30am | 8 Croudace Street | $465,000 – $510,000 | 0410 468 968

11.00am – 11.30am | 96 Howe Street | AUCTION | 0407 826 391

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 11, Jerrawa Close | $730,000 – $770,000 | 4908 5900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 12 Kerrai Close | Guide $700,000 | 0249 260 600

Macquarie Hills10.00am – 10.30am | 1/5 Blaxland Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.30am – 11.00am | 4 Ripon Way | Preview | 0410 312 281

11.15am – 11.45am | 56 Delaware Drive | $670,000 to $695,000 | 4928 7400

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 50 Delaware Drive | $730,000-$790,000 | 4954 7447

Marks Point11.00am – 11.30am | 153 Marks Point Road | $995K to $1.055M | 4944 5600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 7 Village Bay Close | $965K to $995K | 4944 5600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 44 Emily Street | $500,000 – $550,000 | 4908 5900

Maryland11.00am – 11.30am | 36 Seaton Street | $495,000-$535,000 | 0427 491 273

11.15am – 11.45am | 62 Alkoo Crescent | $500,000 to $540,000 | 4955 6900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 18 Karneen Avenue | $650,000 – $700,000 | 4904 8400

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 15 Seaton Street | $510,000 – $560,000 | 0249 260 600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 43 Berrico Avenue | $520,000 – $555,000 | 4989 4021

Maryville12.00pm – 12.30pm | 47 Lewis Street | Auction | 0408 525 362

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 75 Northumberland Street | Price on Request | 4989 4013

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 25 McMichael Street | Auction 3/6/17 | 0410 468 968

Mayfield10.00am – 10.30am | 92 Kerr Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

11.00am – 11.30am | 35 Kerr Street | Auction | 4950 8555

11.15am – 12.00pm | 4 Texas Street | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

11.30am – 12.00pm | 10 Cadell Avenue | $490,000-$530,000 | 0425 278 850

12.00pm – 12.45pm | 32 Upfold Street | $500,000-$550,000 | 4960 0499

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 5/16 Myola Street | $395,000 – $415,000 | 0407 826 391

1.00pm – 1.45pm | 44 Ingall Street | AUCTION | 4960 0499

Mayfield East12.00pm – 12.30pm | 4 Crebert Street | $650,000 | 4908 5900

Merewether10.00am – 10.30am | 4/52 Wilton Street | Guide $470,000 | 0411 573 538

10.30am – 11.30am | 56 Frederick Street | $1.78m – $1.9m | 0411745788

11.00am – 11.30am | 160 Glebe Road | Auction | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 200 Scenic Drive | Price on Request | 4989 4003

11.50am – 12.20pm | 40a Rowan Crescent | Auction | 4902 7222

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 67 Wilton Street | Auction | 4902 7222

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 13 Macquarie Street | Auction 3/6 10.30am | 0418 682 377

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 11 Janet Street | Price on Request | 4989 4003

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 21 Curry Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 3/20 Winsor Street | $750,000 | 4989 4003

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 2/36 John Parade | $490,000 | 4989 4013

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 52 Myamblah Crescent | $890,000 | 4989 4003

Mirrabooka12.00pm – 1.00pm | 67 Hillcrest Road | $735,000 | 4944 5600

Mount Hutton1.00pm – 1.30pm | 51 Auklet Road | $229,950 | 4943 6333

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 189 Old Warners Bay Road | $1.775M to $1.9M | 4944 5600

Murrays Beach2.30pm – 3.00pm | 27 Lake Forest Drive | By Neg $725,000 $765 | 4945 8600

Nelson Bay10.00am – 10.30am | 3/15 Victoria Parade | Guide $475,000 | 4944 5600

Newcastle9.30am – 10.00am | 4/22 Brown Street | $399,000 | 0402 009 532

10.00am – 10.30am | 506/335 Wharf Road | $620,000 – $670,000 | 0417 030 301

10.00am – 10.30am | 609/12 Bellevue Street | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

10.00am – 10.30am | 9/522 Hunter Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.30am – 11.00am | 33/304 Wharf Road | $1,800,000- $1,900,0 | 4902 7222

10.30am – 11.00am | 1/5 Tudor Street | $440,000 – $480,000 | 4989 4013

11.15am – 11.45am | Lvl 6, 6/610 Worth Place | $730,000 | 4902 7222

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 901/6 Watt Street | Auction 27/5/17 | 0410 468 968

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 505/2 Honeysuckle Drive | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 401/5 Honeysuckle Drive | Auction | 4904 8400

2.15pm – 2.45pm | 1/570 Hunter Street | $380,000 – $410,000 | 0417 030 301

3.15pm – 3.45pm | 305/111 Scott Street | $420,000 – $450,000 | 0417 030 301

Newcastle East10.00am – 10.30am | 308/26 Pacific Street | $475,000 – $485,000 | 0407 826 391

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 9 Beach Street | $1.29m-$1.35m | 0412 680 584

Newcastle West10.15am – 10.45am | 401/12 Bellevue Street | $640,000 – $680,000 | 4957 6166

New Lambton9.00am – 9.30am | 1-5/9 Regent Street | $789,000 – $798,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 8 Mahogany Drive | Price On Request | 4902 7222

11.30am – 12.00pm | 3 Hitchcock Avenue | $680,000 | 4989 4013

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 178 Bridges Road | $499,000 | 0411 843 051

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 31 Jellicoe Parade | $690,000 – $759,000 | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 25 Errington Avenue | $700,000 – $750,000 | 4957 6166

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 49 Carrington Parade | Contact Agent | 0412 680 584

New Lambton Heights11.00am – 11.30am | 56 Holly Circuit | $550,000 – $570,000 | 4952 6500

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 7 Grandview Road | $580,000-$630,000 | 4954 7447

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 8 Ridegway Road | $1,325,000 – $1,400, | 4957 6166

North Lambton12.00pm – 12.30pm | 11 Kindra Place | $470,000 | 0418447856

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 13 Notley Street | $449,950 | 4908 5900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 14 Third Avenue | $730,000 – $780,000 | 0413 209 505

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 308 Newcastle Road | $380,000-$410,000 | 4960 0499

Pelican12.00pm – 12.30pm | 30 Karog Street | $645,000-$695,000 | 4915 7888

Rankin Park1.00pm – 1.30pm | 288 Grandview Road | Preview | 4908 5900

Rathmines11.00am – 11.45am | 12 The Circlet | Auction Today | 4959 1677

Raymond Terrace10.00am – 10.30am | 110 Dalyell Way | 489000 | 4928 4000

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 20 Anne Street | $269,000 – $295,000 | 4903 8228

Redhead10.00am – 10.30am | 85 Cowlishaw Street | Guide: $840,000 | 4904 8400

Rutherford10.30am – 11.00am | 17 Grand Parade | $490,000 – $530,000 | 4915 3800

Shortland9.30am – 10.30am | 22 Akuna Avenue | $430,000 – $470,000 | 4989 4013

10.00am – 10.30am | 190 Marsden Street | $550,000-$590,000 | 0412 290 452

11.00am – 11.30am | 25 Mawson Street | $455,000-$495,000 | 4954 7447

Speers Point12.30pm – 1.00pm | 60 Lakeview Street | $660,000 – $710,000 | 4908 5900

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 32 Hibiscus Close | Set Date Sale | 4915 7888

3.00pm – 3.45pm | 17A Berkeley Street | Auction | 0418447856

Stockton10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Monmouth Street | Auction | 4955 6900

11.00am – 11.30am | 276 Fullerton Street | Preview | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 154 Douglas Street | Auction | 4955 6900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 221 Mitchell Street | 1.7m | 4928 7400

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 31 Newcastle Street | Auction | 4955 6900

Tanilba Bay3.00pm – 3.30pm | 48 Caswell Crescent | $700,000 to $770,000 | 4955 6900

The Hill10.00am – 10.30am | 3 Barker Street | $1,500,000 | 4989 4018

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 96 Wolfe Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 4/36 Kitchener Parade | Guide: $375,000 | 4904 8400

The Junction10.30am – 11.00am | 5/17 Kemp Street | $480,000 – $520,000 | 0249 260 600

Thornton12.30pm – 1.00pm | 20 Welwin Close | $465,000 to $500,000 | 4955 6900

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 17 Ridgemont Street | $580,000 – $630,000 | 0408 525 362

Tighes Hill10.00am – 10.30am | 40 Mitchell Street | $700,000 to $750,000 | 4928 7400

10.50am – 11.20am | 60 Elizabeth Street | Auction | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 14 Union Street | Guide on Request | 4929 5999

Tingira Heights1.30pm – 2.00pm | 33 Walumbi Avenue | Price guide $490,000 | 4908 5900

Toronto10.30am – 11.00am | 2&4 Warhurst Avenue | $440,000 – $460,000 | 4959 1466

11.00am – 11.30am | 6 Jarrett Street | AUCTION 01.06.17 | 4975 1644

11.30am – 12.00pm | 1 Cockatiel Street | $495,000 – $539,000 | 4959 1466

Valentine10.00am – 10.30am | 5 Japonica Place | Price on Request | 4989 4003

10.00am – 10.30am | 19 Mountbatten Place | AUCTION 18.05.17 | 4942 8377

10.45am – 11.15am | 5/58 Allambee Place | $390,000 – $420,000 | 4915 3800

11.00am – 11.30am | 56 Berringar Road | $760,000 – $790,000 | 4942 8377

11.00am – 11.30am | 94 Dilkera Avenue | Preview | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 6/25-27 Lurnea Crescent | $459,000 | 4915 3800

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 49 Dilkera Avenue | By Neg $2,350,000 – | 4945 8600

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 1/3 Ruston Avenue | $480K to $520K | 4944 5600

Wallsend10.00am – 10.30am | 7 Dorrigo Street | Guide: $470,000 | 4904 8400

10.00am – 10.00am | 15 Moresby Street | $599,000 – $629,000 | 0400 911 802

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 12 Invermore Close | $549,950 | 4961 5181

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 24 Cressington Way | $575,000 | 4950 2025

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 3 Bean Street | $620,000 to $680,000 | 4955 6900

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 79 Macquarie Street | $400,000 to $500,000 | 4928 7400

Wangi Wangi12.00pm – 12.30pm | 41 Dobell Drive | $1250000 – $1295000 | 4959 8667

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 320 Dobell Drive | $949,000 – $995,000 | 4975 4800

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 4 Crescent Road | $749,000 | 4975 1644

Warabrook1.30pm – 2.00pm | 14 Eurabbie Avenue | $750,000 | 4950 2025

Waratah10.00am – 10.30am | 25 Platt Street | Auction 13/05/17 | 4961 5181

11.30am – 12.15pm | 1, 2, 3/6 High Street | $550,000 – $600,000 | 4989 4011

12.30pm – 1.30pm | 51 Station Street Waratah | Auction 27/05/17 | 0425 290 322

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 10 Myall Road | Guide- $750,000 | 0249 260 600

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 6/50 Waroonga Road | $270,000-$285,000 | 4915 7888

Warners Bay10.00am – 1.00pm | 215/6 King Street | $699,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 4/74 Albert Street | $460,000 – $490,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 99 Myles Ave | – | 4929 5999

10.00am – 10.30am | 6/68 Albert Street | $479,000 | 4915 3800

10.00am – 10.30am | 2/4 Yortson Street | $395,000 – $429,000 | 4902 7222

10.00am – 1.00pm | 221/6 Kings Street | $379,000 | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 95 Bayview Street | $529,000 – $569,000 | 4908 5900

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 6 Peachwood Close | $625,000 – $685,000 | 4903 8228

12.45pm – 1.15pm | 22 Rayford Street | $795,000 – $850,000 | 4903 8228

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 56 Mills Street | Auction | 0418447856

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 2/68 Queen Street | Guide: $390,000 | 4904 8400

West Wallsend3.30pm – 4.00pm | 7 Hyndes Street | $385,000 – $420,000 | 4950 8555

Whitebridge11.00am – 11.30am | 5 Kopa Street | Auction 20/5/17 | 0413 437654

11.00am – 11.30am | 6 Bulls Garden Road | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

11.00am – 11.30am | 142-146 Dudley Road | From $400,000 | 4904 8400

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 44 Justine Avenue | $645,000 – $675,000 | 4943 6333

Wickham10.45am – 11.15am | 106a The Lane | Auction 13/5 11:15am | 0412 680 584

Windale3.30pm – 4.00pm | 12 Wakool Street | $345,000 – $375,000 | 4950 8555

Woodrising1.30pm – 2.00pm | 4 Azzura Close | $455,000 – $485,000 | 4959 8667

Yarrawonga Park11.30am – 12.00pm | 23, Yoorala Road | Preview | 4908 5900

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‘Bills included’: Tent in Sydney backyard advertised for $130 a week

Sydney rents rise at fastest rate since 2011 in ‘worrying’ trendMore ‘rent bidding’ apps to launch in Australia as rental revolution looms’Startling’ study shows long-term tenants going to extremes to make ends meet
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Renters might be used to forking out big bucks to live in inner-city Sydney, but their resolve was seriously put to the test on Wednesday when a tent in a Sydenham backyard was advertised for rent at $130 a week.

Don’t worry, Sydneysiders still have some sense of a fair deal and outrage quickly ensued.

The ad, which was swiftly shared on platforms such as Reddit, stated a $200 bond would also be required and noted potential housemates would have to help keep the house clean and do the washing up.

“Includes all bills and $100/week of communal food that you can add to at your leisure,” the post stated.

“We are also part of a vege (sic) box collective.”

“You would have to be quite clean and taken on responsibilities for cleaning in the house…”

Unfortunately for the person who posted the ad, rather than being inundated with requests to move in, Facebook users quickly slammed the entrepreneurial scheme.

The ‘property’ was also advertised on Airbnb at $36 a night with positive reviews, one noting that the hosts were so friendly the guests had extended their trip from two nights to a week. That listing was also taken down on Wednesday.

It’s not the first time a Sydneysider has tried to make the most of unused spaces. A man living in the nearby inner west suburb of Newtown paid $215 a week to rent a balcony back in 2013.

And it’s not too surprising with Sydney’s median house rent now at $550 a week, and units sitting at $530 a week.

The tent’s listing on Airbnb.

In the 12 months to March, Sydney’s median asking house rent increased by $25, or 4.8 per cent, the biggest annual hike in five years.

Just under 2230 properties in the Sydney and Illawarra area are affordable for people on a minimum wage, according to a recent Anglicare report. That’s about 15 per cent of properties, compared to 17.7 per cent a year ago.

A recently released study found 42 per cent of long-term renters surveyed were struggling due to a shortage of funds, and one fifth had sought assistance from parents or friends.

There are also concerns that the launch of two rent-bidding apps, Life Offer and Rentberry, will exacerbate the situation. I mean, I’d pay $130 to live in a tent in Coogee – but Sydenham?? Flat out ridiculous.??? Jules LeFevre (@jules_lefevre) May 10, 2017

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Balancing comfort and style in a family home

Leaf through any home decor magazine, scroll through home real estate sites, or perhaps an Instagram account of an interior designer and it’s likely you’ll see immaculate spaces, free of clutter, where every piece is well thought out and in its place. Walk into any family home in real life and it’s quite often the opposite. Can you have a home that is both stylish and comfortable? Or do you have to sacrifice one for the other?
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Richard Misso, from interior design company The Stylesmiths, knows how to balance style, comfort and functionality.

“Understanding how a family lives helps us respond with well thought out design solutions that satisfy our clients’ comfort needs,” he says.

“We try to find out if they like to lay across the sofa or sit upright, do they like to elevate their feet? Do they require back support? Do the kids like to sit on the floor? Do they require an adult zone that reflects calm and peace?”

The Stylesmiths recently helped transform an original 1940s dark and disjointed home in Sydney’s eastern suburbs into a family home for four with plenty of space and style.

“There was a strict budget in place with a brief to be very functional yet look good,” says Misso. “In keeping with a beachside feel, everything was kept light and bright in the interior with a bold exterior, navy contrasted crisply with white trims. The neutral palette of concrete floors and blonde timbers could then lend itself to pops of colour through artwork and furniture.

“Subtle features throughout included handmade ceramic tiles to the kitchen splashback and feature pendant lighting to the kitchen and master bedroom.”

The Stylesmiths captured the essence of laid back beachside chic that responded to the young family’s needs and style.

It’s about the details, both overt and covert. A balance between the two makes for a successful interior and cohesive home,” says Misso.

“Hidden or secondary details bring all the elements together connecting the furnishings, paint, surfaces, artwork and lighting; a good example of hidden details is good lighting versus harsh lighting.”

Of course, it’s not just the look at the interior design stage. A home’s functionality, style and comfort have to be considered in the very early stages of planning, and for the home-dweller it might not be immediately obvious what these designs are.

Japanese developers Sekisui House are designing homes with smart floor plans that cater to families.

“We consider how people move about the house,” says Takao Sawai, head of corporate marketing, Australia. “And position particular areas in close proximity to each other to provide comfort and convenience for residents.”

If you’ve just parked your car in the garage after shopping for groceries, for example, their homes provide direct access to the pantry to get everything inside with minimal fuss.

“It’s those sort of little ideas that make a big difference,” says Sawai.

Their way of looking at the housing affordability issue is that you don’t need to sacrifice comfort and design with a smaller floor plan; instead, it can be used to maximum efficiency.

An example is the inclusion of study zones within a central location in the home, instead of being tucked away in a back room.

“A feature of our study nooks is a lower wall height that encourages closeness with children, it provides more family time,” says Sawai.

The company’s development and research team continually measure feedback from their customers to ensure future designs continue to evolve.

“There’s a lot of nice architecture in the world but is it really useable?” he says.

“We are not a company that designs just for aesthetics or just for functionality. We combine lifestyle, safety, style and comfort; somewhere you might want to live for life.”

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In Her Time on trial in Doomben 10,000 for longer interstate campaign

BEN Smith believes In Her Time’s hit’n’run shot at the Doomben 10,000 will point to alot more than just her next Brisbane carnival target.
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PRIMED: Josh Parr, driving In Her Time to victory in the Millie Fox Stakes at Rosehill, will ride her on Saturday. Picture: bradleyphotos南京夜网南京桑拿

The Newcastle trainer’s stable star will resume in the $700,000 group 1 over 1200 metres on Saturday, and the race will double as a trial of her travelling capabilities.

The four-year-old mare has notraced outside of Sydney and the Central Coast and Smith was keen to “test the waters”. In Her Time made the float trip to Queensland on Wednesday night and she was returning home after the race despite plans to run her again north of the border.

“She’s never had to travel before so we’re going up and back for this one to see if she can handle it and see if she’s up to group 1 level,” Smith said. “That will decide where we go.If she runs really well, we’ll look at the [$1.5 million] Stradbrokeand if not we’ll go to the [$200,000] Dane Ripper [both June 10 at Eagle Farm].

“We’re also looking at it as a guide to whether we take her to Melbourne for races in the spring and what we do in the autumn.”

In Her Time won back-to-back group 2 races –the Breeders Classic and Millie Fox Stakes –in February beforefifth on group 1 debut in the Coolmore Classic.

She won a trial at Wyong on May 1 but will hit the Doomben 10,000 first-up from a two-month let-up. Smith said a more patient approach, compared to his early days with the horse, paid off last preparation.

“She seems to race pretty well fresh,” Smith said of the winner of five from 11 starts.

“We’ve learned to space her runs. We’ve spelled her a couple of times, and we’ve tried a couple of places, but shenever spells well.We’re going to have to handpick her races, poke along and keep her fresh and happy.”

In Her Time, with Josh Parr again on board, will startfrom barrier 12of 14 on Saturday. Smith hoped the draw meant hissuccessful front-runner, a $21 shot with TAB Fixed Odds on Friday,could find cover.

“I don’t think it will bother her too much,” Smithsaid of the wide barrier. “There’s obviously speed inside us and it will probably just allow us to do our own thing.She’s good out of the gates and can put herself into a race. She can sit just off them.

“Redzel and Russian Revolution are going to go quite hard, and there are your backmarkers, so it looks like we should be able to put ourselves where we want.Josh has ridden her different ways in trials as well and she’s shown she’s adaptable.

“She’s keen in her work and Josh was very happy with heron Tuesday.She’s taken great improvement from her trial. We’ve got to test the waters at some point and this is a good test for her.”

Smith was also keen to see In Her Time perform again at group 1 level after a luckless effort inthe Coolmore.

“It was a solid run but we were a bit disappointed,” he said.

“If we’d been able to get out when Josh wanted her to, we would have finished much closer.

“She had the wind taken out of her, trying to get out around the 600 and the 450 again. That’s when they started to quicken, and it’s hard in any race to get going again from that.But she held on well, I thought.

“Stretching out to 1500, she needed everything to go right.”

He was confident of a better display with In Her Time dropping back in distance.

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Budget housing affordability measures a ‘help’ to East Maitland first home buyers, but calls for reduction in stamp duty.

Every bit helps.
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That was the verdictfrom Hunter first home buyers on Wednesday, as they welcomednews they will be able to access tax breaks to help them save for a deposit.

SAVINGS MOUNTAIN: East Maitland couple Codie Ellicott and Tae Rowsell are struggling to meet the costs of a first home deposit. They say it will be ‘tricky’, even with the tax breaks announced in the budget. Picture: Perry Duffin

But forCodie Ellicott and Tae Rowsell, pulling together the funds to buy in their hometown of East Maitland remainsa daunting prospect.

“I’ve been working full time for three years and my partner for six or seven years,” Ms Ellicott said. “We’ve been saving throughout, but it’s really hard…the investors can usually offer a higher bid than you.”

Under changes announced in the federal budget, from July first home buyers will be able to salary sacrifice up to $30,000 into super for a deposit.

They will be able to withdraw the money from July 2018.

Retirees will be able to divert up to $300,000 from the sale of their family home to superannuation, encouraging them to downsize. Those incentives will come into effect from July 2018.

Agent Chad Dunn of Century 21 Novocastrian said the changes could result in “decent” savings for young buyers, particularly those in the highest marginal tax bracket.

He predicted there could be a short-term cooling in the market while they took advantage of the changes.

“I had 50 groups through a home on Saturday and easily half of those were first home buyers,” he said.

“I think you will see first home buyers go out of the market and stockpile more funds through this system, and probably come back next year.”

Mr Dunn said the changes for retirees could be a “gamechanger”by bringing a surgeof new stock to the market. But he believes it would have been preferableto introduce the changes immediately, rather than waiting for 12 months.

“Right now we have a really limited amount of stock on the market…those stock levels will certainly change next year when that ruling takes place.”

However according to Mr Dunn, one of the biggest pressures on young buyers was overlooked.

“I still believe stamp duty is tipping the scale,” he said. “They’re missing the third prong.”

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What first home buyers should know before investing in Scott Morrison’s scheme

Finally.
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After missing out on a free education, tax-free property windfalls and the chance to pour tens of thousands of dollars into super almost tax-free, young Australians have finally been thrown a tax break bone.

Sure, it’s more chicken wing than femur. But it’s worth considering for anyone looking to buy a home in coming years.

The First Home Super Saver Scheme unveiled on Tuesday night is expected to deliver first home savers a total tax break of $50 million in the coming financial year, rising to an annual break worth $70 million in four years.

A first home saver who earns $60,000 a year and ploughs $10,000 a year into the scheme for three years will be about $6000 better off than if they’d simply put their money into a bank deposit – the typical first home buyer strategy.

If that doesn’t sound like much moolah to you, you’re probably wasting too much money on smashed avo.

The scheme is unlikely to have a noticeable impact on boosting home ownership rates. By putting more money into borrower’s pockets without also increasing supply, the measure will likely add to home price pressures.

But compared to recent price movements, it’s just a drop in the ocean.

Sydney median dwelling prices jumped $120,000 over the year ended April to $860,000 – a weekly increase of about $2300 a week. Melbourne prices also leapt $100,000 over the year to $650,000 – a little under $2000 a week.

By topping up first time buyer accounts by about $2000 a year, ScoMo’s FHSSS keeps them ahead of the Sydney and Melbourne property markets by about a week.

Still, $6000 is $6000.

So how can first home savers get a bit of that action?

From 1 July 2017, first home savers can instruct their employer to deposit money from their pre-tax income into their super account, where it will be taxed at just 15 per cent instead of the usual marginal tax rates that would apply, currently at 19, 32, 37 and 45 per cent (plus the Medicare levy).

For someone earning between $80,001 and $180,000 on the 37 cent marginal rate, they get a tax saving of 22 cents in the dollar. Instead of pocketing just $6300 in after-tax income from the last $10,000 they earn, they’ll get to keep $8500 and put it into super.

CLICK HERE TO USE THE FHSSS ESTIMATOR AND FIND OUT HOW MUCH YOU COULD GET

Earnings generated on this money while in the super account will also be taxed at the low rate of 15 per cent, compared to paying the full whack of marginal tax on interest earned on bank savings.

The scheme maxes out at a total of $30,000 in contributions per individual and the maximum that can be salary sacrificed in any year is $15,000.

When the time comes to live out the great Aussie dream and buy a home, savers will pay tax on their withdrawal amount at their marginal rate, less 30 percentage points. For a person on the 37 cent rate, they pay just 7 cents. That’s not quite the tax-free withdrawals enjoyed by over 60s from super, but it ain’t bad.

All up, a person earning $100,000 a year who puts $10,000 a year into the scheme for three years would end up with $24,777 to put towards their home deposit, versus just $18,586 if they put their money in a bank deposit. They’d end up paying an average tax rate of 17 per cent, versus 38 per cent.

On the face of it, that’s worth doing.

But there are several things to consider first.

First, and obviously, you have to have the cash to spare. While for higher income earners, this may be a good forced-savings method, low income earners are less likely to have the spare cash. If they do, however, it will be worthwhile, their contributions being essentially tax-free thanks to the low income super tax offset.

Second, you may not be able to squirrel away as much as you think. Importantly, the usual caps on concessional contributions to super apply. From 1 July this year, that’s a maximum of $25,000 in contributions a year – both voluntary and compulsory – which attract the low tax rates. Anyone earning $106,000 or above will already have compulsory contributions of $10,000 and more a year, meaning they can put in less than the scheme maximum of $15,000 a year.

Another kink is that if you earn more than $250,000 you pay an extra 15 cents on your contributions, bringing tax to 30 cents. I know. Cry me a river.

It’s also important to know that, once in, your money can’t be withdrawn for other purposes. If you do not ever buy a home, the money has to sit there until you reach retirement age. If you do decide to buy, however, you can access the funds after a year.

It’s not entirely clear, however, how this will work.

While super funds hold your money, the scheme is administered by the Tax Office, which must calculate how much you can withdraw. How will this work? Will buyers need to show the ATO proof of purchase before accessing funds? If so, how can they get approved for a loan?

A final kink in the scheme is the fixed rate of return savers will get on their money.

To provide certainty, and to save super funds the hassle of calculating actual individual returns, money put into the scheme will be deemed to have returned 3 per cent plus the 90 day bank bill rate each year. Currently, that’s around 4.78 per cent.

If your super fund returns more than that, that excess will just have to stay in your retirement nest egg.

If your super fund performs worse, or even shrinks, the extra amount needed to pay out the deemed rate will be deducted from your retirement nest egg – possibly at a time of depressed values which is exactly when you should leave the money there to recover.

Investing in shares, which super funds do, is best done over the long run, and savers risk falling foul in the short term.

Overall, however, history suggests savers should enjoy a higher average returns on their money in super than a typical bank deposit rate.

Worth considering.

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